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Wise souls wanted for President: Middle East policy

Hillary Clinton facing her legacy of Iraq
Hillary Clinton facing her legacy of Iraq
Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Iraq” is the headline alongside “Hillary”. The Hill reports Iraq as being a dark shadow over Hillary because the present circumstances undermine her declarations of achievements in foreign policy. No one wins on Iraq, and here is why. (See the list.)

  1. Iraq is one of many nation states in the Middle East that fell radically behind the world in maturity that is reflected by a scale of democratic freedom and individual liberty.
  2. It wasn’t until the US knocked Saddam Hussein from power that Iraq began to address its government and leadership problem.
  3. Iraq is a historically recent phenomenon, unnatural and an artificially created nation state.
  4. The people living in today’s Iraq are unenlightened and uninspired toward self-determination and self-governance.
  5. Iraq is still rising from the ashes of obliteration from war, and is combating insurgency from within and from outside as it is a part of a universe of like-kind and like-minded deficiencies.

If Hillary Clinton were not an undeclared candidate for president, her book would be irrelevant. The fact is that the Obama administration and her incumbency as Secretary of State, rode into the Iraq mess on the tails of George W. Bush mistaken policy. One mess led to another.

The situation requires a more comprehensive Middle East foreign policy that addresses layer upon layer of needs. The old word was asymmetrical. That is what it is, a problem situation that is broad and deep, with many networked layers of complexity. Treating it superficially is cosmetic. We’re talking 100 year strategy treating a 2000 year old problem.

"Iraq casts shadow over Clinton

By Alexander Bolton - 06/14/14 06:00 AM EDT

The growing crisis and threat of all-out civil war in Iraq has cast a cloud over Hillary Clinton’s book tour touting her accomplishments as secretary of State.

The release of “Hard Choices” was supposed to remind people of the foreign policy credentials she burnished in the Obama administration.

On Tuesday, White House spokesman Josh Earnest even said Clinton’s greatest accomplishments at the State Department included ending the war in Iraq and “decimating and destroying” al Qaeda.
But those résumé bullet points are now up for debate as Iraq has erupted in violence and insurgents linked to al Qaeda have captured four cities, including Mosul, Iraq’s second-largest metropolitan center.

“It’s going to be a problem for her starting now,” Republican National Committee spokesman Sean Spicer said of the country’s collapsing stability.

"You have the White House three days ago talking about one of her greatest accomplishment was eradicating al Qaeda in Iraq. One of her greatest accomplishments was winding down war in Iraq. Forty-eight hours later we’re dealing with a situation where we’re talking about how to best help eradicate an al Qaeda offshoot in Iraq," he said.

Democratic strategist Tad Devine said it’s too early to say what impact Iraq may have on Clinton’s White House hopes in 2016 but added the stakes are high for both her and President Obama.

“If he deals with it decisively in the next couple months and achieves real progress I think the Iraq story will be a good one for him and Hillary Clinton,” Devine said. “If things deteriorate and there’s a terrible situation that develops there over the course over the next couple years that presents a threat to the United States it will not be good for either one of them.”"

Read more: http://thehill.com/policy/international/209386-iraq-casts-shadow-on-clintons-book-tour#ixzz34cdDW4mN

1. Iraq is one of many nation states in the Middle East that fell radically behind the world in maturity that is reflected by a scale of democratic freedom and individual liberty.
1. Iraq is one of many nation states in the Middle East that fell radically behind the world in maturity that is reflected by a scale of democratic freedom and individual liberty. GALLO/GETTY Iraq enjoys a proud history of 5,000-year-old culture, dating back to ancient Mesopotamia

1. Iraq is one of many nation states in the Middle East that fell radically behind the world in maturity that is reflected by a scale of democratic freedom and individual liberty.

“How ISIS Realigns The Middle East

By Matt Schiavenza
on June 11 2014 4:31 PM

The self-styled Islamic State of Iraq and Syria has, seemingly overnight, emerged as a major player in the Middle East. On Wednesday, fresh from their stunning capture of the major Iraqi city of Mosul, ISIS forces went on to take Tikrit, a city of 200,000 and the birthplace of former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. The radical Sunni Muslim group now controls a vast area of northwest Iraq and eastern Syria, and has rendered the border between the two countries practically obsolete.

ISIS also has acquired the ability to sell oil -- produced at wells in both Syria and Iraq -- on the international market through middlemen. A group that once ran afoul of Osama bin Laden for being too radical is now, according to Douglas Olivant and Brian Fishman, “more akin in organization and power to the Taliban of the late 1990s than al Qaeda.”

http://www.ibtimes.com/how-isis-realigns-middle-east-1598708

2. It wasn’t until the US knocked Saddam Hussein from power that Iraq began to address its government and leadership problem.
2. It wasn’t until the US knocked Saddam Hussein from power that Iraq began to address its government and leadership problem. Khuzaie/Getty Images PHOTO: U.S marines and Iraqis are seen on April 9, 2003.

2. It wasn’t until the US knocked Saddam Hussein from power that Iraq began to address its government and leadership problem.

Here is one glimpse of how outsiders tried to impose “progress” on Iraq.

“British mandate

Ottoman rule over Iraq lasted until World War I, when the Ottomans sided with Germany and the Central Powers. In the Mesopotamian campaign against the Central Powers, British forces invaded the country and suffered a major defeat at the hands of the Turkish army during the Siege of Kut (1915–16). Finally winning in the Mesopotamian Campaign with the capture of Baghdad in March 1917. After the war the Ottoman Empire was divided up, and the British Mandate of Mesopotamia was established by League of Nations mandate. Britain imposed aHāshimite monarchy on Iraq and defined the territorial limits of Iraq without taking into account the politics of the different ethnic and religious groups in the country, in particular those of the Kurds and the Assyrians to the north. During the British occupation, the Shi'ites and Kurds fought for independence. Iraq also became an oligarchy government at this time.

Although the monarch Faisal I of Iraq was legitimized and proclaimed King by a plebiscite in 1921, independence was achieved in 1932, when the British Mandate officially ended.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Iraq

3. Iraq is a historically recent phenomenon, unnatural and an artificially created nation state.
3. Iraq is a historically recent phenomenon, unnatural and an artificially created nation state. Page by Jessica Phelan - (AFP/Getty Images)

3. Iraq is a historically recent phenomenon, unnatural and an artificially created nation state.

“Independent Kingdom of Iraq

Establishment of Arab Sunni domination in Iraq was followed by Assyrian, Yazidi and Shi'a unrests, which were all brutally suppressed. In 1936, the first military coup took place in the Kingdom of Iraq, as Bakr Sidqi succeeded in replacing the acting Prime Minister with his associate. Multiple coups followed in a period of political instability, peaking in 1941.
During World War II, Iraqi regime of Regent 'Abd al-Ilah was overthrown in 1941 by the Golden Square officers, headed by Rashid Ali. The short lived pro-Nazi government of Iraq was defeated in May 1941 by the allied forces in Anglo-Iraqi War. Iraq was later used as a base for allied attacks on Vichy-French held Mandate of Syria and support for the Anglo-Soviet invasion of Iran.[19]

In 1945, Iraq joined the United Nations and became a founding member of the Arab League. At the same time, the Kurdish leader Mustafa Barzani led a rebellion against the central government in Baghdad. After the failure of the uprising Barzani and his followers fled to the Soviet Union.
In 1948, massive violent protests, known as the Al-Wathbah uprising broke out across Baghdad as a popular demand against the government treaty with the British, and with communist part support. More protests continued in spring, but were interrupted in May, with the marshal law, when Iraq entered the 1948 Arab-Israeli War along with other members of the Arab League.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Iraq

4. The people living in today’s Iraq are unenlightened and uninspired toward self-determination and self-governance.
4. The people living in today’s Iraq are unenlightened and uninspired toward self-determination and self-governance. Officials to brief Senate panel on Iraq. An Iraqi family fleeing violence in the northern Nineveh province is pictured. | Getty

4. The people living in today’s Iraq are unenlightened and uninspired toward self-determination and self-governance.

“Post-invasion history

History of Iraq (2003–present)

In 2003, after the American and British invasion, Iraq was occupied by Coalition forces. On May 23, 2003, the UN Security Council unanimously approved a resolution lifting all economic sanctions against Iraq.

As the country struggled to rebuild after three wars and a decade of sanctions, it was plagued by violence between a growing Iraqi insurgency and occupation forces. Saddam Hussein, who vanished in April, was captured on December 13, 2003.

Jay Garner was appointed Interim Civil Administrator with three deputies, including Tim Cross. Garner was replaced in May 2003 by L. Paul Bremer, who was himself replaced by John Negroponte on April 19, 2004 who left Iraq in 2005. Negroponte was the last US interim administrator.

Terrorism emerged as a threat to Iraq's people not long after the invasion of 2003. Al Qaeda now has a presence in the country, in the form of several terrorist groups formerly led by Abu Musab Al Zarqawi. Al-Zarqawi was a Jordanian militant Islamist who ran a militant training camp in Afghanistan. He became known after going to Iraq and being responsible for a series of bombings, beheadings and attacks during the Iraq war. Al-zarqawi was killed on June 7, 2006. Many foreign fighters and former Ba'ath Party officials have also joined the insurgency, which is mainly aimed at attacking American forces and Iraqis who work with them. The most dangerous insurgent area is the Sunni Triangle, a mostly Sunni-Muslim area just north of Baghdad.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Iraq

5. Iraq is still rising from the ashes of obliteration from war, and is combating insurgency from within and from outside as it is a part of a universe of like-kind and like-minded deficiencies.
5. Iraq is still rising from the ashes of obliteration from war, and is combating insurgency from within and from outside as it is a part of a universe of like-kind and like-minded deficiencies. Anbar city of Fallujah, Iraq Photo: AFP/Getty

5. Iraq is still rising from the ashes of obliteration from war, and is combating insurgency from within and from outside as it is a part of a universe of like-kind and like-minded deficiencies.

Actually, it is wrongly worded to say that Iraq is rising from the ashes. Iraq is still disintegrating. Its government is wrong-headed and feeble. Its people are diverse and ununited. Muslim sects, Sunnis and Shias are combatting one another in a religious war that serves no united purpose for humanity.