Skip to main content

See also:

5 California fishing streams closed due to drought

Navarro River
Navarro River
Clinton Steeds, Creative Commons

Despite recent rainstorms, California is in the midst of an extensive drought. Because of its severity, sport fisherman across the state, including those here in Bakersfield and the San Joaquin Valley, may be startled to know that several prime fishing spots are now off-limits to fishermen. California's Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Fish and Game Commission recently enacted emergency drought regulations and closed several rivers and streams, mostly in the northern part of the state.

An interactive map that depicts many, but not all, of the closures is available on the DFG website for public use. As conditions change, some waterways may open and others may close. Additional information may be obtained by calling the following numbers:

North coast: (707) 822-3164
Central coast: (707) 944-5533
South central coast: (831) 649-2886

In the meantime, here are five streams that have been closed to fishing because of the drought:

Navarro River
Navarro River Clinton Steeds, Creative Commons

Navarro River

The Navarro River is in Mendocino County, California and empties into the Pacific Ocean. The river provides habitat for fish migration and spawning.

Brush Creek
Brush Creek Anlace, GNU Free

Brush Creek

Brush Creek is a tributary of Santa Rosa Creek in Sonoma County, California. Part of it has been restored with USEPA funding for steelhead migration and spawning.

American River
American River Devin Cook, released to Public domain

American River

The American River runs from the Sierra Nevada mountain range to its confluence with the Sacramento River in Sacramento, California. It is one of the rivers for which fishing has recently been banned due to California's drought.

Ten Mile River
Ten Mile River David Eppstein, Creative Commons

Ten Mile River

Ten Mile River is a river in northern Mendocino County, California, United States. It was named Ten Mile River because it is10 miles (16 km) north of the Noyo River.

Russian River
Russian River Lanthanum57, Creative Commons

Russian River

The Russian River, flows through Sonoma and Mendocino counties in Northern California. It is the second largest river  flowing through the nine county Greater San Francisco Bay Area.