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Establishment media helped eliminate Ron Paul: Video

A video recently posted on You Tube by "ThinkOutsideTheTV" provides highlights and an intriguing analysis of how the establishment media did its part in eliminating a viable candidate, Ron Paul, from the presidential election. It is embedded for viewing to the left on this page.

Ron Paul consistently drew thousands to his rallies in nearly every state, many more than other GOP contenders, yet was rarely given equal coverage by the corporate media.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Three days after the November election, I published an article entitled "The Ron Paul factor in the GOP's defeat." The text of that article is below.

While a lot of the blame for Ron Paul's elimination in the GOP primary can be attributed to Republicans rigging the primary process and the subsequent alienation of Ron Paul supporters, much of the blame can also be attributed to how the mainstream media covered the GOP primary and neglected to cover Ron Paul's popularity and successes.

Thanks to the various contributors to this video, the bias in the media against Ron Paul is now summarized and well-documented. I strongly recommend taking the time to view this video, whether or not you are a Ron Paul supporter, because it illustrates how corporations and special interests have taken control of our electoral process and turned the U.S. into a post-constitutional republic. The video also points to polls that showed Paul would have fared better than Romney against President Obama in the general election.

Americans are forced to choose between the lesser of two evils in the polls, but the lesser of the evils is still evil if there is not a third choice. Jill Stein of the Green party would probably agree, as well as Ron Paul. Regardless of party affiliation or preference, the point is that Americans need to have their votes counted and their voices heard in Washington. It is becoming clear that is not what is happening.

The Ron Paul factor in the GOP’s defeat (full text)

A full three days after the GOP took a shellacking in the general election, as many as 19 reasons have been put for the by both parties, pundits and the corporate media as they grope for explanations. The woman’s vote, the Hispanic vote, media bias, a poor campaign message, Tea Party extremism, Romney too moderate, hurricane Sandy, New Jersey governor Christie, even voter suppression – the list goes on and on.

While all of these factors did come into play, the truth may be that the single most significant factor is what the Republican establishment did to one of its own candidates, Dr. Ron Paul, and his many ardent supporters. By disenfranchising Ron Paul supporters, Romney won the primary, but because of that he may have lost the election. For that the GOP has no one to blame but itself and very few in either party or the media seem to want to mention the Ron Paul factor.

In the Republican primary, Ron Paul’s delegates and supporters were systematically shut out of the process, yet Karl Rove has the nerve to say on Fox news that President Obama won by “suppressing the vote.” Take a closer look at your own party, Karl.

Ron Paul brought the youngest delegation in the history of the Republican Party to the convention (RNC) in Tampa in August. They were not political hacks, millionaires, corporatists or attorneys – they were ordinary young adults from all walks of life who thought they could make a difference. They were welcomed by GOP hacks by having their signs confiscated and torn up before their eyes.

The Maine delegation, apparently having too many Ron Paul supporters, was unseated and then walked off the floor at the RNC, chanting, “As goes Maine, so goes the nation.” It is befitting that Maine’s electoral votes went for President Obama.

Ron Paul delegates even sustained injuries as they were arrested in Louisiana after it became clear to GOP leaders that they were in the majority at the state convention. After Ron Paul supporters booed Romney’s son Josh at the state convention in Arizona, the air conditioning and lights were turned off by GOP operatives in order to prevent Ron Paul delegates from being elected to a party position. Romney campaign officials were caught distributing fake delegate slates in Maine and Nevada. In Missouri, police were called to shut down the St. Charles caucus when a Ron Paul victory appeared imminent.

While young people are encouraged to follow their dreams and ambitions, to get involved and make a difference in many aspects of their lives, that is apparently not allowed in Republican Party politics. And the pundits wonder why President Obama secured a majority among voters under 30.

Here is another reason why the GOP lost badly. It is called simple math. The following statistics were put together by Hamdan Azhar, writing for policymic.com. It reveals that, “in no less than five states, Romney’s margin of loss to President Obama in the general election was less than the number of votes received by Ron Paul in that state’s primary.”

Florida
Obama votes: 4,141,618
Romney votes: 4,094,952
Romney loss margin: 46,666
Paul primary votes: 117,461
Electoral votes: 29

New Hampshire
Obama votes: 366,089
Romney votes: 325,668
Romney loss margin: 40,421
Paul primary votes: 56,872
Electoral votes: 4

Ohio
Obama votes: 2,691,861
Romney votes: 2,584,620
Romney loss margin: 107,241
Paul primary votes: 113,256
Electoral votes: 18

Virginia
Obama votes: 1,868,191
Romney votes: 1,767,692
Romney loss margin: 100,499
Paul primary votes: 107,451
Electoral votes: 13

These four states alone account for 64 electoral votes and if you were to take 64 away from Obama and give them to Romney that is the difference right there. Of course, it not safe to assume that everyone who voted for Paul in the primary would have turned out and voted GOP. Nor it is safe to assume that Ron Paul could have won a general election against President Obama or that the Libertarian ideology would sell to the majority of Americans. But it is safe to assume that many Ron Paul supporters would have turned out and voted had they not been suppressed and alienated by their own party leaders.

Furthermore, several “Ron Paul Republicans” won close House races, including Thomas Massie in Kentucky, and Justin Amash and Kerry Bentivolio in Michigan. But Republican “Tea Party” candidates lost across the board – again.

While all exit polling, post-election assumptions and even the statistics are an inexact science, one thing is clear. The GOP not only turned off large amounts of women and minority voters, but a lot of young people within their own party.

Here is what one Ron Paul supporter was quoted saying on a Libertarian blog: "I want to make sure that when the Republican Party loses, terribly…I want [them to know] it's because they systematically shut out the most intelligent, most youthful and active voting bloc in American history."

Perhaps their leaders should take a closer look at disenfranchising their own voters instead of blaming Mother Nature, the changing demographics in America or candidates that are not conservative enough. Very few Americans seem to care for disenfranchisement, voter suppression and intimidation.

Republicans now have fours years to think about that while they argue among themselves and while President Obama continues to try to fix the mess that their last “winner” left for America.

Sources:

The Brad Blog

Huffington Post - Karl Rove: Obama Won 'By Suppressing the Vote'

Huffington Post - Ron Paul Convention Delegates Accuse Security Of Suppressing Their Signs

Masslive.com

Raw Story - Louisiana GOP spirals into chaos as Ron Paul delegates injured, arrested

RT - Ron Paul is not OUT! He is UP!

Infowars.com - Romney Operatives Caught Handing Out Fake Ballots In Nevada AND Maine

USA Today - Contention, confusion mar Missouri caucuses

Policymic.com - The Ron Paul Effect: How the GOP Threw the Election By Disenfranchising Ron Paul Supporters

The Daily Caller - Several ‘Ron Paul Republicans’ win closely contested House races

Reason.com - RNC Shuns Ron Paul, Supporters Root For Romney Defeat

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