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Obama: Voter fraud doesn't exist, supporters of voter ID 'frauds'

Barack obama speaks at Al Sharpton's National Action Network
Barack obama speaks at Al Sharpton's National Action Network
John Moore/Getty Images

While speaking at Al Sharpton's National Action Network in New York, Barack Obama dismissed claims that voter fraud exists, Breitbart.com reported Saturday. Obama also said those who want to ensure the integrity of elections through voter ID laws are frauds involved in a plot to take voting rights away from minorities.

"Let's be clear. The real voter fraud is people who try to deny our rights by making bogus arguments about voter fraud," Obama said, citing studies he claimed indicate there is very little to no voter fraud in federal elections. According to Obama, no "real widespread voter fraud" exists.

Obama's statements, however, fly in the face of a recent report indicating massive voter fraud in North Carolina in the 2012 election. According to that study, released just this month, 35,750 voters with the same first and last name and date of birth were registered in N.C. and another state and voted in both states in the 2012 general election.

Obama did not mention that study, however. What makes that number significant is the fact that double voting in federal elections is election fraud under state and federal statutes and could result in jail sentences.

Yet Obama, who, Breitbart noted, "hails from a city known for the Daley Machine," ripped conservatives for wanting laws in place to ensure only registered voters participate in elections, and only vote once. According to the president, any effort to reduce fraud in voting is an assault on civil rights.

"The right to vote is threatened today in a way that it has not been since the Voting Rights Act became law nearly five decades ago," he asserted.

"Voters who want to vote should be able to vote," he said. "Period."

The president assured the crowd that Attorney General Eric Holder and so-called civic organizations will keep an eye on voting laws passed by states. He also vowed that he and Holder would "fight back" against what he called efforts to suppress the vote.

Ironically, Al Sharpton warmly welcomed Melowese Richardson, a former Ohio poll worker who was convicted in 2013 of voter fraud, at a kick-off rally for a state amendment dealing with voting rights in late March. Richardson admitted voting twice for Obama in 2012, and was indicted for voting at least six times. She was also charged last year of illegal voting in the 2008 and 2011 elections.