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Nancy Grace: Marijuana legalization in Colorado 'horrible idea'

Court-TV and CNN personality Nancy Grace speaks during a rally in support of the Children's Safety Act (H.R.3132) July 26, 2005 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.
Court-TV and CNN personality Nancy Grace speaks during a rally in support of the Children's Safety Act (H.R.3132) July 26, 2005 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.
Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

To Nancy Grace, marijuana in Colorado or any state in the Union is a bad idea. Grace, the popular HLN host appeared on CNN Monday and talked about the idea of legalizing pot in America with a lead-off about the state of New York mulling the idea. In usual fashion, Grace didn't hold any punches back about cannabis, citing a Jan. 7 HLNTV news report.

If Grace, former "Court TV" host, had the power to disallow or approve pot for casual use, "Mary Jane" would never make it to the hands of those simply wanting to get high.

Nancy Grace on marijuana approved for recreational use:

When I’m at work, I don't want my baby sitter high on pot. Alright. Does anybody? Do you want your children; do you want your parents, your sister, your brother to be taken care of or driven around by some who's high on pop because it's okay in Colorado?"

And then, to cap things off, Grace said "The ones that are disagreeing are lethargic, sitting on the sofa eating chips," before referring to them as "fat and lazy."

Grace sat with CNN anchor, Brooke Baldwin, to talk about, among many things, the Jan. 1 milestone of Colorado's approval to have pot sold to residents of legal age.

At least 20 or more states already have laws in place that allow pot to be used in one form or another. However, only Washington state and Colorado statutes allow marijuana for everyday use.

Grace was not coy about taking her anti-marijuana legalization rhetoric to the mainstream by outing her stance on nationwide TV.

And as you can expect, critics came out against and shared their thoughts about her castigation of the status quo. Perhaps, it was the "fat and lazy" quip that sent some in the social media verse off kilter.

Here are some of the milder outcries from viewers of Nancy Grace's marijuana rebuke:

Nancy Grace thinks pot smokers are lazy? False. I've never been more motivated to get @TacoBellin my life.

— Tee-Aye-Are-Aye (@th3_st0rm) January 6, 2014

As a fat and lazy person, I don't appreciate Nancy Grace accusing me of smoking pot

— D Funk Time Michaels (@darinlovesbacon) January 6, 2014

Nancy Grace called marijuana users fat & lazy. Yeah, that's totally why Colorado is the thinnest state in the US: http://t.co/Xc6ECfSki6

— STEVE HUFF (@SteveHuff) January 6, 2014

Nancy Grace just called pot smokers "fat and lazy". Right. Unlike the buff marathon runners home 4 o'clock on a Monday watching your show.

— God (@TheTweetOfGod) January 6, 2014

The debate marijuana legalization is mixed.

On one side, proponents say there is no evidence that one person has ever overdosed on pot. Moreover, many tout the benefits of having the drug as a form of alternative medicine.

Critics say pot legalization in Colorado or anywhere else in the United States, creates a slippery slope. Like Grace, many believe it will amount to higher unemployment rates, increased accidents due to impaired drivers, increases in accidents and injury-related deaths, increases in truancy, strains on state, federal and local governments for care subsidies, crowded jails, stressed judicial systems, and a sense of lawlessness.

It's unclear what impact legal cannabis will have on a civilized United States. Time will only tell.

Was Nancy Grace's marijuana indictment appropriate or out of line?

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