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How to start a full-time home eBay business

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Some sellers choose to make money on eBay as a hobby, but other sellers have had a major life crisis that led them to online selling because they cannot hold a traditional job. eBay provides a flexible way to earn money from home, with no start-up costs, and the only limitation for earning money on eBay is the amount of time a person chooses to work on the business. Anyone with the desire to succeed can start an eBay business, completely free of charge, and start making money in a few weeks.

People with life-altering chronic illnesses like MS, Fibromyalgia, Cancer, Lupus, Leukemia, Crohn’s Disease, chronic pain, and other illnesses are using the power of eBay to take responsibility for their current situation and financial future. Some chronically ill people physically cannot hold a traditional job because they do not know what their day will be like, they must spend much of their time receiving medical treatments, or their medication makes them ill. Others are caregivers for an aging parent, an ill spouse, or a special needs child and must be home all day. Some have suffered an unexpected job loss or are corporate refugees and don’t want to re-enter the work force for the fear being a victim of downsizing or layoffs. These folks have figured out that an online business allows them to earn money on their schedule, gives them independence, and for many, provides an interesting and fun distraction from their difficult daily life.

The best way to get started on eBay is to follow this plan:

1. Learn the eBay landscape by becoming a buyer first. If you are brand new to eBay, buy a few things to understand how the site works. Take an online beginner’s course to learn how to sell an item, collect payment, ship the item, and set up an eBay space in the home.

2. Sell items you already have. According to a 2011 study by NPR, the average household has $7,000 worth of items that can be sold online – not even antiques or collectibles – but items like broken appliances that can be parted out, vintage clothing and shoes, craft and sewing supplies, holiday decorations, and sporting goods. Just about everything has value on eBay. Items already in the home serve as free inventory – no need to spend money buying anything to resell at first. It can take 6-12 months to fully work through the average home selling items that are unwanted, unneeded, or not used. Practice on items you already have before buying inventory to sell.

3. Find items cheaply in the local community and resell on eBay. Once a new seller has worked through their home, then they will have knowledge of the types of items to sell, how to research selling prices, shipping, answering customer questions, and all the other details about selling. This knowledge and experience will help a seller choose other items to sell – items that can easily be sourced at thrift stores, garage sales, estate sales, consignment stores, or flea markets. Gently used items have the highest profit margins on eBay.

eBay is an accessible way for anyone with the desire to succeed to make extra money from home. Sellers from all walks of life, from countries around the world, in all age groups, from different socioeconomic backgrounds, and with various educational levels make enough money on eBay selling full-time to support their families. Anyone can tap into the income-generating power of eBay.

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