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Drudge Report editor exposes: 'The most racist comment I've ever heard'

Allen West speaks out about racism
Allen West speaks out about racism
Getty Images/John W. Adkisson

Drudge Report editor and columnist, Joseph Curl, shared a story in his Wednesday Washington Times' column of the most chillingly racist comment he had ever heard a white man utter. The story was second-hand from someone he trusted without question. In a nutshell, after a patched-interview with a gorgeous black woman, the very well-known host who is still on the tube daily, had whispered to his friend, a guest of the show, "I can't believe we used to own those."

Hearing of that remark from a white man whose face is familiar to millions brought home to Curl what he has always known, that Americans undeniably "own her sins." Of all of America's sins, Curl said slavery will be our "biggest sin, forever." Recalling that a white man leered and made such an atrociously racist comment "sickens" Curl, as it should all Americans.

Curl went on to acknowledge that at the time of their enactment, both the United States Constitution and the Declaration of Independence were based upon lies because "blacks could be legally owned for nearly 80 years after that band of white men penned the Constitution." He explained, "That Independence pledge, that 'All men are created equal,' that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, didn’t apply to blacks (and not to women either)."

Curl recounted how America's progress has proven to be so slow that well into 1960 Communists were able to make propaganda hay with American's racist past, with America's claims of "democracy." Facts were that even though the North fought a civil war to end slavery, the North fought against allowing the blacks to vote. Historically, Democrats must own the label of racist, says Curl, because it was they who propagated Jim Crow laws in the South.

Hope and change finally came, according to the Drudge Report editor, when Republican Dwight D. Eisenhower deployed an escort of federal troops for the purpose of assuring that nine black students were allowed to safely enter an all-white school. Officially, government sanctioned racism ended when white Republicans took on southern white Democrats to pass the Civil Rights Act.

John F. Kennedy called for the Civil Rights Act in 1963. After Kennedy's death President Lyndon B. Johnson, signed into law the Civil Rights Act in 1964. The goal was that all discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin, was to end.

Still, Curl said, "that didn't end racism." For proof, all one has to do is check the headlines that rage "racism" on the Drudge Report. Whether it's about an owner of a basketball team, a rancher, a Southern cooking show hostess, or an actor who heads a duck call company, Curl pointed out, stories of racism occur way too often.

To make sense of how to deal with racism in this century, Americans must listen to what fair-minded black men have to say, urged Curl, because Curl thinks that it's an issue white voices may not meaningfully approach. In that spirit, Curl held up Allen West as his example.

West's article on racism is on its way to viral. It was published on April 30, 2014, has been shared on Pinterest nearly 102,000 times, shared on Facebook over 93,000 times, shared on Twitter over 1,000 times. The Drudge Report did not boost West's viewership with a link on the Drudge Report.