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'Bones' 'The Source in the Sludge' recap: Business is business

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The Monday, March 10 episode of "Bones" brings back Freddie Prinze, Jr. as Booth's CIA friend Danny Beck in a big way – and brings the show back to Mondays after its brief time on Fridays.

Can Danny be trusted? "Bones" returns with another set of gross remains, and these were left in a bag at the site of a fishing contest – with lampreys inside. The victim has a pin in her leg after a fracture, so it's easy for them to get an ID, but when Booth and Brennan go to deliver the bad news to her brother, Danny's there. Sari had been an asset who had helped the CIA take out a target, Ibrahim, engineer and bomb-maker, in Afghanistan. Danny then brought her and her brother over and set them up with new lives, but the serpents seem to fit Ibrahim's signature, leading them to wonder if he didn't die in the drone strike.

Sari's brother becomes a suspect when they discover twine connected to his job and that he had bought a disposable phone and made calls to the terrorist's number two guy to try to find a way to return home; if he had killed her, he would have made peace with Ibrahim. However, he then reveals that Sari was sneaking out at night, and when Booth and Brennan turn to Danny for answers about his asset, he tells them he doesn’t know where she was going.

The signs then begin to point to Danny, especially when they discover that Sari was killed with a Special Forces knife, Danny's Special Forces knife he considered part of himself. That's when he reveals that he gave it to her to protect herself because he loved her. In the same conversation, he reveals that the CIA received intel that Ibrahim was there and Sari was just a warning shot.

It once again looks like Ibrahim killed her because after cutting into her eye, Cam discovers that Sari died of dehydration, just like victims in bombings do from being trapped. It's when they find that Sari bit her attacker and inhaled particles of his skin that they ID her killer: Derek Johannessen, the soldier who had been guarding Ibrahim for six months when the army had him in custody. Derek's also the one responsible for the "intel" the CIA received. The only problem is he's willing to give them Ibrahim's entire network in exchange for his freedom, and the Department of Justice is on board with that. Unfortunately for Derek, however, the case landed with Booth, and he and Danny aren't just going to let him get away with murder. After Derek spouts off "business is business" at Booth and Danny, they reveal that he will pay for what he did. The military is still paying for his rehab, and the military court is separate from the Department of Justice. He's being charged with treason and murder, and those carry the death penalty. He's not getting away with it.

It's rational Brennan takes offense when she finds out the insurance company wants to charge her more and thinks it's more dangerous for her to be in the field than Booth, even as he and Hodgins point out that Booth has more training and experience. While Booth is left to wonder what he should do ("Am I supposed to start my own insurance company?" He asks Sweets), Brennan decides to put together a file and enlist her friends to speak on her behalf to the insurance company – under oath. However, in the end, Brennan runs the numbers and can't argue with the insurance company's rationality and she's always willing to pay extra to be in the field with Booth.

Distracted at work Daisy isn't on top of her game in the lab, making mistakes she shouldn't and missing things she should have noticed, and while she blames it on studying for her orals, she reveals to Sweets that they weren't rescheduled and she took them – and failed. He advises her to just tell Brennan because she'll understand, and to Daisy's surprise, Brennan reveals she too failed her orals; that's because the board wasn't competent enough to judge her. After hearing that, Daisy's back on the top of her game, but going a little too far to prove she belongs there and acting as though she's in the middle of her orals at the lab.

A sweet moment As Hodgins watches the 360-million-year-old lampreys, Angela makes a really nice connection that does a good job of recapping what he's been through and how he's handled it: "In the last year, you lost your fortune and you found out you have a brother who then turned out to be mentally ill. You’ve had all these major life changes happen and never once complained or fallen apart or felt sorry for yourself. You took it in stride. …Not many people could deal with what you have. And there are these 360 million year old creatures who have stayed the course, just like you, no matter what evolution has thrown at them. It just makes sense you’d take a shine to them."

"Bones" season 9 airs Mondays at 8 p.m. on FOX. What did you think of episode 16, "The Source in the Sludge"?

Read more about Bones.

© Meredith Jacobs 2014

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