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  • Sterling Holloway as Jack Pumpkinhead and Shirley Temple as Tip in two more stills from "The Land of Oz."
    Oz on Film, Part Forty-five: More Notes on Shirley Temple's "Land of Oz"
    Rounding out the cast of characters in Shirley Temple's television production of The Land of Oz were the following:William Keene as the Royal Army of Oz. Genial and dithery, armed with a blunderbuss, this incarnation of Omby Amby/Wantowin...
  • The Grave of Dorothy Gage and the Munchkin who restored it
    Oz on Film, Part Thirty-three: Just a Sampling of Oz Trivia
    Last time I told you that Adriana Caselotti, the voice of Walt Disney's Snow White, had a "vocal cameo" in MGM's The Wizard of Oz. Over the years, many such tidbits of information-- as well as rumors-- have abounded which have...
  • Oz Inspires Oz
    Oz on Film, Part Twenty-one: Oz Inspires Oz
    It has been very interesting to me, in the reading I’ve done about all the early dramatizations of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, to realize how many concepts and innovations we now associate with the 1939 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer musical version...
  • The Silent Era of Oz
    Oz on Film, Part Sixteen: Trivia Time!
    In this series of articles chronicling the movie adaptations of Oz, I have been mentioning in passing the titles of the Oz books which were published during the years in which the films came out, and it occurred to me that it might be informative,...
  • Just one of several video packagings of Baum's three Oz movies, plus another silent Oz film which will soon be spoken of
    Oz on Film, Part Twelve: A Sad and Happy Ending
    Like The Fairylogue and Radio-Plays—and, if one is honest, many of L. Frank Baum’s projects throughout his life—The Oz Film Manufacturing Company proved to be a wondrous, well-regarded failure. Children were delighted by the...
  • An advertisement in "Moving Picture World" about the Oz Film Manufacturing Company and its features.
    Oz on Film, Part Twelve: The Oz Film Company's Manufacturings, Part Six
    TheOz Film manufacturing Company’s two Oz book-based movies, while having no stated continuity between them, can nonetheless be comfortably considered as happening in the same version of Oz, despite key characters (the Scarecrow, the Tin...
  • Aunt Rivette (Mai Wells), Princess Fluff (Mildred Harris), and King Bud (Violet MacMillan) adjust to court life in "The Magic Cloak of Oz"
    Oz on Film, Part Eleven: The Oz Film Company's Manufacturings, Part Five
    The Oz Film Manufacturing Company produced one more tenuously Oz-based movie. Though entitled The Magic Cloak of Oz, it is really an adaptation of Baum’s book Queen Zixi of Ix. To be sure, the Land of Ix is in the same fairy region of the...
  • More images from "His Majesty, The Scarecrow of Oz" top row: The Tin Woodman, Button-Bright (Mildred Harris), the Scarecrow, and Dorothy set out, the Cowardly Lion (Fred Woodward) joins the quest. bottom row: Mombi prepares to freeze Gloria's heart.
    Oz on Film, Part Nine: The Oz Film Company's Manufacturings, Part Three
    On their quest to overthrow King Krewl and rescue his niece Princess Gloria from Mombi’s heart-freezing spell so that she can be reunited with her true love Pon the gardener’s boy—and indeed to free him from being a kangaroo the...
  • Stills from "His Majesty, The Scarecrow of Oz" top row: Frank Moore as the Scarecrow, Violet MacMillan as Dorothy Gale, Pierre Couderc as the Tin Woodman, Mai Wells as Mombi. bottom row: Frank Woodward as the Mule, Vivian Reed as Princess Gloria.
    Oz on Film, Part Eight: The Oz Film Company's Manufacturings, Part Two
    It has been rumored that an actress named Mildred Harris (one day to become Mrs. Charlie Chaplin) appeared briefly in The Patchwork Girl of Oz (The Oz Film Manufacturing Company, 1914) as Dorothy Gale. This is not so, but she did have a featured...
  • Scraps and Scarecrow
    Oz on Film, Part Seven: The Oz Film Company's Manufacturings, Part One
    The Patchwork Girl of Oz, released in 1914, was remarkably faithful to the book of the same title. To be sure, any changes could not be seriously challenged, since the screenwriter of the film was also the author of the book. Nearly six decades...
  • Oz Players
    Oz on Film, Part Six: The Company of the Oz Film Manufacturers
    What sort of movies did the Oz Film Manufacturing Company manufacture? As should come as no surprise, two of them were adaptations of Oz stories, specifically The Patchwork Girl of Oz (from the book of the same name) and His Majesty, the Scarecrow...
  • The Heads of the Oz Film Manufacturing Company
    Oz on Film, Part Five: The Oz Film Manufacturing Company
    In 1910, the year that Selig's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was released, L. Frank Baum and his family moved to California, settling in Hollywood, where he built a house called Ozcot. He established himself quickly in the social scene and became...
  • The silver screen's second Dorothy Gale, Bebe Daniels
    Oz on Film, Part Three: End of the Yellow Brick Road? Hardly!
    The Fairylogue and Radio-Plays, which had received a mammoth marketing campaign, was a hit with the few audiences who got to see it, but ended up a financial disaster for Baum. The sheer cost of transporting the personnel and equipment (including...
  • Dorothy and her friends
    Oz on Film, Part Two: Travels Through Fairyland
    At the age of eight, Romola Remus had achieved the dream of many a little girl before and millions more since: to be Dorothy Gale.As one of the stars of L. Frank Baum's The Fairylogue and Radio-Plays, and raking in the astronomical sum of five...
  • The True Wizard of Oz
    Oz on Film, Part One: The Royal Producer of Oz
    L.Frank Baum published the book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 1900.Along with Paul Tietjens and others, he created the first stage adaptation of that story in 1902, and went on to create two more musicals set in his marvelous fairyland.So it...