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"The Expendables 3" Music By Brian Tyler Soundtrack Album Review

"The Expendables 3" Music By Brian Tyler Soundtrack Album Review
"The Expendables 3" Music By Brian Tyler Soundtrack Album Review
Courtesy of Getty Images/La-La Land Records

"The Expendables 3" Music By Brian Tyler Soundtrack Album Review

Rating:
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"The Expendables 3"

Music By Brian Tyler Soundtrack Album Review

La-La Land Records/19 Tracks/Disc Time: 60:03

Grade: C+

After the rousing success of "The Expendables" and "The Expendables 2" it was pretty much a given that "The Expendables 3" was a no brainer for this successful franchise. For this third outing of the franchise, Sylvester Stallone and his motly crue of mercinaries (Jason Statham, Dolph Lundgren, Jet Li, Terry Crews, Randy Couture) are back at work after the rescue of their comrade Doctor Death (Wesley Snipes), Barney Ross sees an old familiar face from his past in the person of Conrad Stonebanks (Mel Gibson), his former "expendable" partner who he had assumed was dead and has become a meglamanical villain. After half his crew is eliminated, Barney sets out to recruit with the help of Bonaparte (Kelsey Grammer). a new group young and tough group that will follow in their footsteps. However, when Stonebanks ups the ante and kidnaps the youngsters, Ross and company with the help of Trench (Arnold Schwarzenegger) and Drummer (Harrison Ford), Barney ups the ante and goes after Stonebanks once and for all.

Also returning to the franchise is composer Brian Tyler who's been on a serious roll of late with hit films such as this Summer's "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" reboot, "Iron Man 3", "Thor The Dark World", and "Now You See Me", continues his streak of providing some propulsive action material which also includes the Tornado thriller, "Into The Storm". "The Expendables 3" is a score that definitely falls in line with others scores that he has written so far for the franchise which are big and hard core epic fun in their own way. The question is does this score fall in line with the other scores or does it take it a step above them. Well, the score definitely does fall in line with the first two with some new subtle differences, but it's pretty much what you'd expect from the other two films.

From the get go, the score is pretty much a hard core musical propulsive machine that utilzies a little more electronics with a complimentary electric guitar to reinforce the material with. "The Drop" opens the album introduces us to some new and refreshing material. Tyler is also introduces some more new themes and dramatic material in tracks such as "Lament", "Late For War", "Threat Doubled", "Moral Chess Game", "Galgo's Grand Entrance", which features a nice classical acoustic guitar motif, "The Art Of War", which has a sinister classical ambiance about it with a nice keyboard solo and bringing back the memorable "Expendable theme" in "The Last Window", which is a percussive and moody piece which has always been one of my favorite themes in the series along with the full rendition featured in the exciting "Armored Freaking Transport" (how's that for a title). The rest score and the album is just pure intense action that in parts brings back memories of earlier scores like "The Hunted" and "Alien Vs. Predator: Requiem" highlighted by tracks such as "Look Alive", "Stonebanks Lives", "Too Much Faith", "Infiltrating The Block", "Valet Parking Done Right", and "Package Secured". All of these tracks are well done and different from one another instrumentally and musically, but the base and foundation that Tyler has established in epic fashion is there for sure. Tyler you have to give credit for really crafting a score that really works for if and the film are supposed to do together and that is thrill audiences and this score does help that cause alot.

La-La Land's release (here in the U.S.) is nicely conceived album that isn't chronological as the way Tyler's solid action score appears in the film. What the album is, is an energetic listening experience that the first two scores in the franchise also had and that is always a good thing. This is an album that Tyler's fans will enjoy as well as fans of the film and what you definitely get is alot of bang for the buck and that's what he gives you. It isn't a perfect score like the ones he's done on this current renassance that Tyler is going through, but it'll be one that will eventually stand out in the long run. "The Expendables 3" gets a marginal thumbs up and mostly for originality and some fun rhythmic material.