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The Amazing Spider-Man #1.3

The Amazing Spider-Man #1.3

Rating:
Star4
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The Amazing Spider-Man 1.3 "Learning To Crawl Part 3" continues the early days of Spider-Man's "career" with a modern day twist. Spider-Man's biggest fan, Clayton Cole, another teenage genius, created a secret identity for himself and he calls himself "Clash." In the previous issue, all Clash wanted to do was team up with Spider-Man, but not knowing the extent of his powers, he nearly killed Spider-Man. Spider-Man embarassed Clash by webbing him up so that he can't cause any more trouble or get anyone hurt. This is where Spider-Man's number one fan became his mortal enemy.
Clayton sits in front of his computer viewing footage of the Crusher Hogan/Spider-Man wrestling match, and because the video went viral, he feels like he launched Spider-Man's career. So he figures, if he could do this for Spider-Man, then he could do this for Clash. After having a meltdown, Clayton's mom tells him to keep the noise down, and this is where he comes up with an idea to defeat Spider-Man.
At the Parker residence, Aunt May has entered Peter's locked room and discovered something major, so much so, that Peter's "Spider-Sense" kicks in. Peter thinks she's discovered that he's Spider-Man, but it's something else. Peter tells her that he's going to enter his "super-adhesive" in the science fair. What she doesn't know is that this adhesive is really his web fluid.
At the science fair, some of Peter's friends talk and show each other their science projects. One of his friends, Polly, notices Clayton playing his guitar, and she decides to talk to him because she's fascinated by him. Clayton, being a home-schooled student, talks to her, but he doesn't want to blow it, he just wants to keep his cool. This is his chance to show her and everyone else who Clash is, and the idea excites him. Peter shows up with a "portable antimagnetic inverter," and this doesn't impress the judges because they expect so much more from Peter. Even Peter's friends aren't impressed, especially since they're dressed up as their favorite costumed heroes. Clash makes his debut and Peter suits up to take on this new threat, hero or villain, he knows that Clash is out of control.
The climactic fight between Clash and Spider-Man takes over the next set of panels, and once the fight is said and done, part of the ceiling caves in, and Spider-Man has to hold on for dear life, especially since Aunt May is there. Once he sees that everyone's okay, Spider-Man leaves by going out the window, and Peter enters the room. At this point, Aunt May is terrified of Spider-Man, and Clayton has to keep a low profile for now. Aunt May's final words for Peter are ones that he will remember for a long time, if not forever.
This issue is a good read, it gives us some missing pieces that were never told back in the 60's. The modern day twist still bothers me a bit, but not enough to eliminate how good this story is. There are valuable lessons to be learned in this issue, and that's what makes the 60's Spider-Man era so great. Peter's still learning how to be a great hero as Spider-Man, he doesn't have that much experience yet, and he has to deal with everyday high school life. The introduction to Clayton is nice, because there's another person who has similarities to Peter, sans the spider bite. I give The Amazing Spider-Man 1.3 a 3 1/2 out of 5 stars, the story is good, the artwork is perfect for a story of the 60's era, and the colors bring it together nicely. The Amazing Spider-Man 1.3 is written by Dan Slott, illustrated by Ramón Pérez, and colored by Ian Herring. This issue has 21 pages, retails for $3.99, and is available now in print and on digital formats.

Regular cover for The Amazing Spider-Man #1.3, written by Dan Slott, art by Ramón Pérez, colored by Ian Herring, and cover by Alex Ross.
Regular cover for The Amazing Spider-Man #1.3, written by Dan Slott, art by Ramón Pérez, colored by Ian Herring, and cover by Alex Ross.
© 2014 Marvel Characters.