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Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Turtles In Time #2

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Turtles In Time #2

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The time traveling turtles are back in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Turtles In Time #2, and in the previous issue we saw the turtles camping out in a cave, while being stranded in the prehistoric time period. This time, the turtles are transported to ancient Japan, and out of nowhere, Renet shows up again, just like she did in the prehistoric time, from the previous issue. Like before, her speech is altered, and she is unable to communicate with the turtles. So like before, she disappears into thin air, and this leaves the turtles wondering how to get home to their time period.

Cover for Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Turtles In Time #2, written by Erik Burnham, art by Charles Paul Wilson III, and colored by Jeremy Mohler.
2014 IDW Publishing.

Since the turtles know they're going to be in old Japan for some time, the first thing they must do is find disguises. Raphael notices four samurai bathing in a river, and their armor is laying right by the turtles, but Leonardo tells Raph that they can't steal the samurai's armor, but Raph makes Leo realize that they really don't have any other choice, so they put the armor on. Now that the turtles have disguises, they can travel without standing out.

Not too far away, a man is being attacked by some ninjas, and Michelangelo wants to help, but Donatello realizes that this could have major consequences in the future, but Michelangelo doesn't care, he doesn't like bullies. The turtles are able to help the man, and due to the difference in the language they speak, the ninjas think that the turtles are demons. Michelangelo speaks with the man, since he's the only turtle who can speak Japanese, and the man invites the turtles to his place for a meal to show gratitude for stepping in on the fight. Then he tells the turtles his name, and the turtles are shocked to find out that this man is Hamato Yoshi...in his human form.

A lot of bonding goes on at the home of Hamato Yoshi, and Michelangelo even plays with the human, child version of himself. As awkward as this may seem to the other turtles, Leonardo knows the fate of Hamato Yoshi...Oroku Saki, in the future known as The Shredder, kills Hamato Yoshi's wife, Tang Shen, and their four sons. The next morning, the turtles realize that Leonardo's gone, and they ask for Tang Shen's help. Just as Oroku Saki is about to assassinate one of his men who has failed him, Leonardo shows up to stop him. Leonardo spars with Saki, and during the fight, the guards outside notice that the other turtles are heading their way via horseback. Eventually, the turtles tell Leonardo that he can't change the past, because he will alter the space-time continuum, and this could affect their current state; they may cease to exist. Leonardo realizes that they're right, so he gives Saki one final kick to the face, and they run out. Just as the turtles are about to fight another group of Saki's men, they are transported to another time period. Timing is everything. The epilogue of this issue marks the beginning of things yet to come. Maybe the turtles of the future had something to do with the events of the past. Only time will reveal itself.

This time leap is a personal one for the turtles than the first one was, and this made the story emotionally deep. It's easy to side with Leonardo, and we want to see him take out Saki before he assassinates the Yoshi family, but in essence, past events shouldn't be tampered with. Good or bad, things happen for a reason. If the turtles ceased to exist, who would save the New York of the turtle's universe? Who would stop Krang from building the Technodrome? This issue dealt with more serious matters than the first issue, and that's what made this issue a great read. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Turtles In Time #2 is written by Erik Burnham, art by Charles Paul Wilson III, and colored by Jeremy Mohler. I give this issue a 4.5 out of 5 stars, and it has 24 pages, retails for $3.99, and is available in print and on digital formats.