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Pineville Tavern is a best bet for a local night out

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Pineville Tavern

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The Pineville feed mill then general store then hotel and now tavern was built in 1742. Situated at the crossroads of Pineville Road and Route 413, the building was the hub of what was then a small crossroads town. Like many Hotels of its day, the Pineville had a front porch upon which friends, neighbors, patrons, and travelers gathered.

The bar

This local vibe remains at the Pineville Tavern, particularly in the old bar where the bartenders know the names of most patrons. Most of the Pineville retains the sense of an unpretentious old school bar/restaurant where you can kick back with a beer but also bring the kids. The bar is old. The shelves that hold the booze behind the bar are funky and original. The linoleum is scuffed.

The food

Don’t go to the Pineville for a low calorie dinner, because the handmade egg rolls will throw you right off the wagon. Buffalo chicken and Philly cheese steak egg rolls are a guilty pleasure. Fried egg roll wrappers stuffed with chicken in the one case and steak and cheese in the other are greasy in a give me more faster kind of way, especially when they are dipped in blue cheese dressing or spicy ketchup. Calamari is another fried starter that will invoke greasy smiles.

The homemade ravioli

The ravioli is homemade by the owner Andrew Abruzzese. Other pasta dishes are standard tavern fare, from pasta and meatballs to rigatoni Bolognese. The half portions are nice after a huge, fried appetizer. The salads are fresh as are the vegetables served with the more dinner style meals. The food at the Pineville is consistent. It’s hearty. There is something for everyone and everyone always seems happy with what is placed in front of them to eat on any given night.

The ghost

Sit in the older rooms of the Pineville to soak up the true vibe of the building. Rumor has it there’s a ghost in the building...but then how could there not be after 272 years as a public gathering spot?

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