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Kid Comedy So Good, It's Awesome

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Awesomeness TV

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It is not always easy to judge the trajectory of a basic cable networks programming. For every AMC and Comedy Central--- networks that went from rerunning classics to creating dynamite original programming--- there is an A&E or Bravo, going from high culture to the lowest forms of reality TV. For me, personally, the hardest one to watch has been the fall of Nickelodeon.

Bad enough that Nick at Nite has dropped to the dregs of 80's TV--- does anyone consider Full House and George Lopez classic TV?--- in recent years, their broadcast offerings for children and tweens have hit the bottom of culture, and then mined lower. For those of us who remember when Nick was once the home of such funny and subversive programming as Clarissa Explains it All, Salute Your Shorts and Keenan & Kel, it's sad to watch such offerings as iCarly and The Haunted Hathaways pollute the air. Sadder still is the fate of their once hysterical Nicktoons. Shows such as Rugrats, Doug and Rocko's Modern Life were daring, insightful, and a lot of fun. If there's anything revolutionary in Spongebob Squarepants, I haven't seen it over ten years.

But in recent weeks, I have seen a prime-time offering that has offered hope that they might be coming out of their funk. Long-time viewers of Nick know that there is a daring and rollicking history of sketch comedy shows dating back almost to the founding of the network. Shows such as You Can't Do That On Television, Roundhouse, and All That ,which offered ribald wit disguised as teenage grossout humor, have long been a staple of Nick. Now comes the arrival of Awesomeness TV, a comic series which offers tropes and parodies modern TV in a way that would make Lorne Michaels look up and blink.. Bits such as 'Kid History', ' and 'Terry the Tomboy' riff on the modern adolescent while mixing elements of teenage pastiche. I don't know if today's tweens will get the satire of 'The Most Interesting Kid in the World' bits, but every time I hear the theme music, it makes me smile. And watching the cast go out into the world, and do things like compliment people on things you wouldn't normally compliment or carry and break boxes of TV, demonstrate comic timing that Johnny Knoxville never mastered.

Of course, trying to explain why Awesomeness TV is hysterical just makes it sound horrible pedantic, when it contains the main element that so many comedies for teens and adults lack--- it's just funny. If there is a flaw, it is the fact that the cursed practice of Nick of running the credits tiny and fast at the end of every episode, makes it impossible for me to individualized shout outs or recognize (if history is any indication) the future comic stars and writers that will be populating 'adult television' in the next five to ten years. But trust me, they're there. And maybe there's live in that slimy network yIt is not always easy to judge the trajectory of a basic cable networks programming. For every AMC and Comedy Central--- networks that went from rerunning classics to creating dynamite original programming--- there is an A&E or Bravo, going from high culture to the lowest forms of reality TV. For me, personally, the hardest one to watch has been the fall of Nickelodeon.

Bad enough that Nick at Nite has dropped to the dregs of 80's TV--- does anyone consider Full House and George Lopez classic TV?--- in recent years, their broadcast offerings for children and tweens have hit the bottom of culture, and then mined lower. For those of us who remember when Nick was once the home of such funny and subversive programming as Clarissa Explains it All, Salute Your Shorts and Keenan & Kel, it's sad to watch such offerings as iCarly and The Haunted Hathaways pollute the air. Sadder still is the fate of their once hysterical Nicktoons. Shows such as Rugrats, Doug and Rocko's Modern Life were daring, insightful, and a lot of fun. If there's anything revolutionary in Spongebob Squarepants, I haven't seen it over ten years.

But in recent weeks, I have seen a prime-time offering that has offered hope that they might be coming out of their funk. Long-time viewers of Nick know that there is a daring and rollicking history of sketch comedy shows dating back almost to the founding of the network. Shows such as You Can't Do That On Television, Roundhouse, and All That ,which offered ribald wit disguised as teenage grossout humor, have long been a staple of Nick. Now comes the arrival of Awesomeness TV, a comic series which offers tropes and parodies modern TV in a way that would make Lorne Michaels look up and blink.. Bits such as 'Kid History', ' and 'Terry the Tomboy' riff on the modern adolescent while mixing elements of teenage pastiche. I don't know if today's tweens will get the satire of 'The Most Interesting Kid in the World' bits, but every time I hear the theme music, it makes me smile. And watching the cast go out into the world, and do things like compliment people on things you wouldn't normally compliment or carry and break boxes of TV, demonstrate comic timing that Johnny Knoxville never mastered.

Of course, trying to explain why Awesomeness TV is hysterical just makes it sound horrible pedantic, when it contains the main element that so many comedies for teens and adults lack--- it's just funny. If there is a flaw, it is the fact that the cursed practice of Nick of running the credits tiny and fast at the end of every episode, makes it impossible for me to individualized shout outs or recognize (if history is any indication) the future comic stars and writers that will be populating 'adult television' in the next five to ten years. But trust me, they're there. And maybe there's live in that slimy network yetIt is not always easy to judge the trajectory of a basic cable networks programming. For every AMC and Comedy Central--- networks that went from rerunning classics to creating dynamite original programming--- there is an A&E or Bravo, going from high culture to the lowest forms of reality TV. For me, personally, the hardest one to watch has been the fall of Nickelodeon.

Bad enough that Nick at Nite has dropped to the dregs of 80's TV--- does anyone consider Full House and George Lopez classic TV?--- in recent years, their broadcast offerings for children and tweens have hit the bottom of culture, and then mined lower. For those of us who remember when Nick was once the home of such funny and subversive programming as Clarissa Explains it All, Salute Your Shorts and Keenan & Kel, it's sad to watch such offerings as iCarly and The Haunted Hathaways pollute the air. Sadder still is the fate of their once hysterical Nicktoons. Shows such as Rugrats, Doug and Rocko's Modern Life were daring, insightful, and a lot of fun. If there's anything revolutionary in Spongebob Squarepants, I haven't seen it over ten years.

But in recent weeks, I have seen a prime-time offering that has offered hope that they might be coming out of their funk. Long-time viewers of Nick know that there is a daring and rollicking history of sketch comedy shows dating back almost to the founding of the network. Shows such as You Can't Do That On Television, Roundhouse, and All That ,which offered ribald wit disguised as teenage grossout humor, have long been a staple of Nick. Now comes the arrival of Awesomeness TV, a comic series which offers tropes and parodies modern TV in a way that would make Lorne Michaels look up and blink.. Bits such as 'Kid History', ' and 'Terry the Tomboy' riff on the modern adolescent while mixing elements of teenage pastiche. I don't know if today's tweens will get the satire of 'The Most Interesting Kid in the World' bits, but every time I hear the theme music, it makes me smile. And watching the cast go out into the world, and do things like compliment people on things you wouldn't normally compliment or carry and break boxes of TV, demonstrate comic timing that Johnny Knoxville never mastered.

Of course, trying to explain why Awesomeness TV is hysterical just makes it sound horrible pedantic, when it contains the main element that so many comedies for teens and adults lack--- it's just funny. If there is a flaw, it is the fact that the cursed practice of Nick of running the credits tiny and fast at the end of every episode, makes it impossible for me to individualized shout outs or recognize (if history is any indication) the future comic stars and writers that will be populating 'adult television' in the next five to ten years. But trust me, they're there. And maybe there's live in that slimy network yetIt is not always easy to judge the trajectory of a basic cable networks programming. For every AMC and Comedy Central--- networks that went from rerunning classics to creating dynamite original programming--- there is an A&E or Bravo, going from high culture to the lowest forms of reality TV. For me, personally, the hardest one to watch has been the fall of Nickelodeon.

Bad enough that Nick at Nite has dropped to the dregs of 80's TV--- does anyone consider Full House and George Lopez classic TV?--- in recent years, their broadcast offerings for children and tweens have hit the bottom of culture, and then mined lower. For those of us who remember when Nick was once the home of such funny and subversive programming as Clarissa Explains it All, Salute Your Shorts and Keenan & Kel, it's sad to watch such offerings as iCarly and The Haunted Hathaways pollute the air. Sadder still is the fate of their once hysterical Nicktoons. Shows such as Rugrats, Doug and Rocko's Modern Life were daring, insightful, and a lot of fun. If there's anything revolutionary in Spongebob Squarepants, I haven't seen it over ten years.

But in recent weeks, I have seen a prime-time offering that has offered hope that they might be coming out of their funk. Long-time viewers of Nick know that there is a daring and rollicking history of sketch comedy shows dating back almost to the founding of the network. Shows such as You Can't Do That On Television, Roundhouse, and All That ,which offered ribald wit disguised as teenage grossout humor, have long been a staple of Nick. Now comes the arrival of Awesomeness TV, a comic series which offers tropes and parodies modern TV in a way that would make Lorne Michaels look up and blink.. Bits such as 'Kid History', ' and 'Terry the Tomboy' riff on the modern adolescent while mixing elements of teenage pastiche. I don't know if today's tweens will get the satire of 'The Most Interesting Kid in the World' bits, but every time I hear the theme music, it makes me smile. And watching the cast go out into the world, and do things like compliment people on things you wouldn't normally compliment or carry and break boxes of TV, demonstrate comic timing that Johnny Knoxville never mastered.

Of course, trying to explain why Awesomeness TV is hysterical just makes it sound horrible pedantic, when it contains the main element that so many comedies for teens and adults lack--- it's just funny. If there is a flaw, it is the fact that the cursed practice of Nick of running the credits tiny and fast at the end of every episode, makes it impossible for me to individualized shout outs or recognize (if history is any indication) the future comic stars and writers that will be populating 'adult television' in the next five to ten years. But trust me, they're there. And maybe there's live in that slimy network yet

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