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Is It Worth It: Jacob's Ghost White Whiskey by Jim Beam

A bottle of Jacob's Ghost white whiskey by Jim Beam.
Myself

Jacob's Ghost White Whiskey

Rating:
Star2
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Today we'll be examining a new product in the Jim Beam line, Jacob's Ghost in my newest series, "Is It Worth It?". Jacob's Ghost was designed to resemble whiskies of the era that the founder of Jim Beam, Jacob Beam, distilled in. A little history can be found below (taken from a previous review):

"Jim Beam as a company began selling bourbon whiskey around 1795 when Johannes "Jacob" Beam made the first batches in his distillery named Old Tub. The whiskey at that point in time was named Old Jake Beam."

Before I begin, I believe it is important for me to note that this whiskey is not a white dog or moonshine spirit. It is in fact aged in a barrel for a year. If you peer into the bottle, you will notice a faint brown to yellow tinge. The nose has a few of the defining Bourbon characteristics: the vanilla, caramel, toffee, but they are much less pronounced than a typical Bourbon enthusiast might expect. Instead, you get heavier notes of the corn in the mash. The flavor still brings one's senses back to Beam's white label product to begin with, but the expected bite dies off in the sip quickly and fades into softer notes of corn, barley, honey, and a slight rye and oak from the barrel.

Is it worth it?

At roughly 21 dollars per 750 ML at your local area Spec's here in Houston, the price of admission is probably too high for most Beam fans who realize that the white label is closer to 15 dollars with four years of age minimum and the sublime eight year aged Jim Beam Black is the same price. Is it worth it? Probably not unless the person purchasing it is interested in trying something new. The fact is, it doesn't hold up well in traditional whiskey cocktails, is a bit too abrupt on the palate, and really doesn't do all that well in other cocktails where vodka and gin are king.

Rating: 2 out of 5

Preferred Tasting Method: On the rocks or with cranberry juice and a hint of lime.