Skip to main content

See also:

In 'Edge of Tomorrow,' death is just the beginning

Edge of Tomorrow

Rating:
Star4
Star
Star
Star
Star

After Europe is attacked by an unknown alien force, new technologies are developed to drive back the enemy. Major William Cage is the head of public relations between the military and the public. When Cage is ordered to record the action on the front line of their latest offensive, he refuses. Immediately arrested for desertion, Cage finds himself demoted and thrown into action for which he has never trained. With death all around him and his own quickly approaching, Cage finds himself cursed with an ability, which could drive him mad or could be the key to defeating an unstoppable enemy, intent on the destruction of mankind. Trapped in an endless cycle of death, Cage struggles to find the truth behind his ability and a way to end the war.

Live. Die. Repeat.
Live. Die. Repeat.
Warner Bros. Entertainment
Live. Die. Repeat.
Warner Bros. Entertainment

At first glance, the trailers read like a first person shooter, disguised as a feature film. Had it gone that way, more than a few viewers may have been disappointed. Fortunately, "Edge of Tomorrow" doesn't proceed down this path. It drives on, facing the enemy on equal footing, unraveling an action packed thriller, which takes time to humanize its lead and his fellow combatants. Surprisingly, character development is the key to the success of this film and its plot. Once again taking up the reigns as a reluctant soldier in a war against an all powerful enemy, Tom Cruise stars as Major William Cage. Rounding out the cast in co-starring and supportive roles, Emily Blunt (Special Forces warrior Rita Vrataski), and Bill Paxton (Sgt. Farell) play prominent roles in the futuristic slugfest. Blunt, as always, is stunning and appealing as an actor and in her guise as the "Full Metal Bitch," hero of their war against alien invaders. Paxton dawns yet another pseudo role, bring an enjoyable amount of the ridiculous into a story dependent on the repetitious slaughter of many of its characters.

Beyond a bevy of strong and well crafted characters, "Edge of Tomorrow" sports an impressive array of visual effects and CG moments. Generally, the CG is impressive and never takes away from what is a surprisingly captivating storyline. Even so, at times the aliens came across as a little too cartoony in their performance. Their speed and destructive power were clear and often provided an ample amount of shock and awe, while still seeming just a little less believable than the other virtually generated aspects of the film. In spite of this minor break in suspended disbelief, "Edge of Tomorrow" is a fun and fully formed piece of theatrical science fiction. Even if you're not interested in effects, this film has plenty of character to keep you intrigued and on the edge of your seat.