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Graphic Novel Review: 'Justice League Volume 5: Forever Heroes'

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'Justice League Volume 5: Forever Heroes' Graphic Novel

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DC Comics’ massive Universe-wide event “Forever Evil” was way too large to amass in one volume. The story continues in the graphic novel “Justice League Volume 5: Forever Heroes.” It collects issues 24 through 29 of the dramatic action-packed monthly series.

Dick Grayson and a band of super heroes come against the Crime Syndicate when it appears the Justice League has been eradicated by Ultraman and his group of evil doppelgangers. However, Owlman has ulterior motives for Batman's former sidekick and wants Nightwing alive.

Cyborg is one of the last remaining Justice League members ready to do battle and needs to recruit some fresh soldiers for his army. After being upgraded by his father, the cybernetic warrior turns to the only group he is sure can defeat Ultraman and his gang. Will the Metal Men join him in his crusade against Earth's malevolent enemy of the hour?

Geoff Johns pens the engaging tale and keeps readers glued to each page in “Justice League Volume 5: Forever Heroes.” How he can be the Chief Creative Officer of a major comic book publisher and form such a complex storyline that stretches across several monthly titles is beyond me. He certainly knows how to interweave the different characters’ personal goals and vendettas to create a seamless and organic narrative worthy to be adapted into a weekly prime-time series.

Ivan Reis and Doug Mahnke handle the penciling for “Justice League Volume 5: Forever Heroes.” Their styles differ slightly, but accent each other quite well. The change in drawing types doesn’t prove to be distracting in a negative manner and only adds a bit of variety to the book.

Eleven pages of bonus material are found in “Justice League Volume 5: Forever Heroes.” Six different variant covers are included by artists like Aaron Kuder, Jon Katz, Jim Lee, Dan Panosian, and a Robot Chicken one by RC Stoodios. A Justice League Sketchbook features pages and cover layouts by Ivan Reis. Variant cover roughs are provided by Aaron Kuder.

“Justice League Volume 5: Forever Heroes” is rated “T” for Teens. There’s nothing much here aside from the usual comic book violence. Things get a bit graphic when Cyborg is left for dead by the Crime Syndicate and other instances. However, it’s nothing we haven’t seen in “The Dark Knight” or “Man of Steel” movies.

Geoff Johns, Ivan Reis, and Doug Mahnke have manufactured quite the sensational and absorbing yarn for fans of the DC Universe with “Justice League Volume 5: Forever Heroes.” Cyborg enthusiasts will love the fact that the character gets the limelight and basically heads up the massive strike against the Crime Syndicate. Those who enjoy appearances by the Metal Men will be pleased as well.

“Justice League Volume 5: Forever Heroes” is available to order now in hardcover and Kindle editions.

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