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Fred Conlon and His Bots Take Over Art Festival

Humpty Dumpty was not a casualty of the Gnome Be Gone Bots.
Humpty Dumpty was not a casualty of the Gnome Be Gone Bots.
Nadia Archuleta

Fred Conlon metal art

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Ok, you know how those pesky gnomes and pink flamingos take over your front yard. I mean, you go to bed with a perfectly clear lawn, and you wake up to find it infested with "yard art."

The 2014 Art Festival took place despite the rain.
Nadia Archuleta

If it were mice, you'd get a cat. If it were cobras, you'd get a mongoose. But what do you do for yard art gone wild?

Fred Conlon of Salt Lake City's Sugar Post apparently asked himself that question and designed his line of Gnome Be Gone (GBG) pest removers.

And then he took over the Downtown Denver Arts Festival.

Ok, he didn't really take over the Arts Festival. Although he did have some prime real estate at the Performing Arts Complex, right near the entrance and high enough on the hill to avoid the puddles of water many of his artistic compatriots were wading in.

Back to his eradicating GBG bots. Made from recycled and reclaimed materials, Conlon's pieces have a heavy metal edge emphasized by the fact that dismembered gnomes and pink flamingos are often included. No joke, he's even got GBGs that have taken a chunk out of surfboards.

Then there's Skeleton King. I imagine it presides over a yard-art-free world now populated by GBG bots. These are some fun little guys, though, riding chainsaw-chain tanks or a UFO seemingly made of a barbecue grill.

The Downtown Denver Arts Festival featured many premier artists, especially from the Southwest. Conlon's GBG bots stole the show, though -- especially since the bots can become their own character!