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Top 5 differences between promotion and spam on social media

Spam on social media, anyone?
Spam on social media, anyone?
Photo by David McNew/Getty Images

There is a fine line between promoting and spamming someone online, especially on social media networks. Here are the top five differences between promotion and spam on social media, so one makes sure that posts are tasteful and well received. That is, rather than being met with a groan and disconnection on social platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. Here is an overview of the differences.

Informative?
Informative? Adam Berry/Getty Images

Informative?

Promotion is a technique for telling users on Facebook or other social media networks something new about a product or service, usually by sharing a content post or video. Spam is not informative but instead tells users to click the post or video so that the owner of it gets a kickback such as money earned per click. Being uninformative is usually accompanied with being low-quality content.

The frequency of posting
The frequency of posting Mark Kolbe/Getty Images

The frequency of posting

Promotion of posts on social media is done sparingly throughout the day; so, on Twitter the same link could be shared on Monday morning, Tuesday afternoon and Wednesday evening. As people frequent the network at various times, the link will likely be seen by different people each time. Meanwhile, spamming users on Twitter involves frequently sharing the same link. That is, more than once in a day and several times in a week, without regard for whether the same people are viewing it each of these times.

Sharing the love
Sharing the love Michael Regan/Getty Images

Sharing the love

Often, spammers on social media share a lot of content they created themselves, whereas promoters balance shares of their own posts with posts from other sources. That means that spamming activities overwhelmingly say, “look at me; me, me,” promotion is more about “this is a great post from so-and-so that I found” with an occasional share of one’s own content. That latter method provides balance that social network users appreciate.

Tasteful?
Tasteful? Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Tasteful?

To spam is to be in poor taste or “cheesy.” Look at #1-#3 above and consider the overwhelming message sent by sharing one’s own material on the social media platforms throughout the day, several times a day. Their hope is to get several clicks on the posts. On the other hand, promotion is sharing insights into trends relevant to one’s business and not overwhelming users with one’s own content; in other words, it is a more tasteful approach than a spammer would take.

Embraced or outed
Embraced or outed Hunter Martin/Getty Images

Embraced or outed

While social platforms encourage users to share quality content on their sites, they spend large sums of money to target and remove spammers from their platforms. Why? Spammers often share low-quality content and may even be fake profiles. Plus, the sheer frequency of postings can irritate users to the point that they stop frequenting the networks or remove their accounts. As long as promoters share quality content without the “me, me, me” message, they usually are accepted on the social networks.

Given the list of the top five differences between promotion and spam on social media, would you say that you see one type more frequently than the other in an average day? Also, would you add any other differences to the list? If so, what are they?