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Top 5 Black prerelease cards from 'Journey Into Nyx'

5. Master of the Feast
Wizards of the Coast

"Journey Into Nyx" will be the newest "Magic: The Gathering" expansion made for release on May 2. However, this weekend, April 26-27, local gaming stores will be holding prerelease tournaments which will be a Sealed event.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with Sealed events, players will receive two "Theros" booster packs, 1 "Born of the Gods" booster, 2 "Journey Into Nyx" boosters, and 1 seeded booster pack. These are the cards you'll get to play with, and, of course, you'll also get a spin-down die and some other reading material.

With this in mind, Boston Games Examiner has put together a top five list of cards you should keep an eye for in your "Journey Into Nyx" booster that may give you some help. This list originally started out as an overall list. However, it quickly became apparent that each color had a lot to offer. Therefore, there is a list for each color.

We're not claiming to be experts here. If you have a different opinion, then don't be shy. Leave a comment below.

For now, here is the top five black cards for the "Journey Into Nyx" prerelease....

Also don't forget to click the links below for the blue and white card lists as well.

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5. Master of the Feast
5. Master of the Feast Wizards of the Coast

5. Master of the Feast

This is just a great example of a fat creature for a low mana cost. Did anyone mention that thing flies as well? Chances are, when you cast this spell it will immediately have a target on it, and so it should. Unless you opponent can kill it or remove it, they will be on a four turn clock. Good luck to him or her.

4. Extinguish All Hope
4. Extinguish All Hope Wizards of the Coast

4. Extinguish All Hope

Having a mass removal spell is one of the best things that a person could wish for in Limited. This card would have been higher on the list if it weren't for a few drawbacks. Remember, this is a heavy enchantment set. So, the fact that it only destroys non-enchantment creatures is unfortunate. It also costs quite a bit to cast. Players are so used to a four casting cost board wipe that six looks very clunky.

3. Silence the Believers
3. Silence the Believers Wizards of the Coast

3. Silence the Believers

It's been said many times how great removal is in Limited. Not only does this remove a creature, but it exiles them. Which means that it can hit the gods that might be played during your prerelease and against you. If you have the mana to support it, then it cam remove multiple creatures. It's added bonus of removing the auras attached to the creatures as well makes this a fantastic removal spell. It means that bestow creatures will not be hanging around. "Silence the Believers" probably would have been either number two or number one on our list if the casting cost of the strive cost was not so high. Sadly, they both are, but it's still good enough to earn the number three spot.

2. Feast of Dreams
2. Feast of Dreams Wizards of the Coast

2. Feast of Dreams

This card is very reminiscent of "Doom Blade" and "Ultimate Price." Both cards were highly coveted in Limited and were the best removal spell at the time. In an environment where enchantments are everywhere, this is an almost perfect removal spell.

1. Dictate of Erebos
1. Dictate of Erebos Wizards of the Coast

1. Dictate of Erebos

It was a tough choice between this and "Feast of Dreams" for the number one spot on our list for black cards. However, this won out for a couple of reasons. The biggest reason is that it felt like a removal spell that stuck around. Granted you need to have one of your own creatures die in order for your opponent to sacrifice a creature, but then the spell sticks around for another effect, and another, and so on. That's the ideal scenario at least. It's flash ability allows it to come into play in response to your creature dying, so its a neat little combat trick that may catch your opponent off guard. Finally, the casting cost can be considered high, but for the lasting effects, it may be worth it.