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Possible, past, Chicago business cards are here

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Having business cards is an inexpensive way to advertise your business. You can personally distribute these cards so you know who and what companies have them. Although you will get less exposure than advertising in magazines and newspapers, personally distributing business cards gives your advertisements that personal touch.

Business cards are graphic design whether they have all text, or a combination of text and graphics. They may not have complete addresses of streets, city and state; you may just have on them your name, business name and phone number. (This is appropriate if you work in a small town, or if you work in a large town that has one, well-known company.)

Colorful, embossed business cards can qualify as miniature art exhibits. Colorful text is interesting. Business cards with unique fonts and/or unusual, fonts’ arrangements can qualify as art. This is typography.

Business cards that are larger than the usual three and one-half inches (width) x two inches (height) will give this art greater exposure in the form of card space. Some post cards that are four inches (height) x six inches (width) can be business cards and qualify for special postal rates. Mailing hundreds of these will, of course, give such businesses greater exposure.

It would be interesting, fantastic and educational to travel backward in time to early Chicago. Although information is lacking about the Chicago area before Jean Point du Sable and Antoine Ouilmette, since that time many people have founded many businesses. As a graphic designer traveling to a past, Chicago era, it would be interesting to observe the reaction of a trolley car inspector as you show him a business card that you designed specifically for him.

I. Artist/Painter in Old Chicago

II. Du Sable Business Card

III. Fort Dearborn Business Card

IV. Model T Mechanic

V. O’Leary Business Card

VI. Ouilmette Business Card

VII. Roller-Coaster Inspector

VIII. Stone Mason Business Card

IX. Telephone Booth Repairman

X. Trolley Car Inspector

Artist/Painter at Old Chicago
Artist/Painter at Old Chicago © 2014 Vernon Brookins

Artist/Painter at Old Chicago

Old Chicago (now defunct) was an attempt to establish a nearby amusement park after Riverview Park went out-of-business. Bolingbrook, Ill. was the nearby, Chicago suburb. Old Chicago was only around for five years.

DuSable Business Card
DuSable Business Card © 2014 Vernon Brookins

DuSable Business Card

Jean Baptiste Pointe du Sable is Chicago's founder. He was also a trader (fur instead of stocks and bonds). This business card graphic design is probably something Du Sable would like to advertise his trade business.

Fort Dearborn Business Card
Fort Dearborn Business Card © 2014 Vernon Brookins

Fort Dearborn Business Card

Fort Dearborn, Chicago no longer exists as a structure; however, a plaque, near Michigan Avenue and Wacker Drive, is at its former position. This fort's commander, Captain John Whistler, may have liked this business card.

Model T Mechanic
Model T Mechanic © 2014 Vernon Brookins

Model T Mechanic

Certainly Model T Fords traveled upon old Chicago's, cobblestone streets. These early automobiles frightened the horses that were the motive powers for horse-drawn carriages, but because these cars transported people quicker, and were more sanitary (They did not leave droppings.), they endured. Maintenance for these cars required mechanics.

O'Leary Business Card
O'Leary Business Card © 2014 Vernon Brookins

O'Leary Business Card

Mrs. O'Leary's cow got the rap for starting the Chicago Fire. However, Mrs. O'Leary declared otherwise. Was she and her cow scapegoats? She would probably like this business card.

Ouilmette Business Card
Ouilmette Business Card © 2014 Vernon Brookins

Ouilmette Business Card

Antoine Ouilmette was an early, Chicago resident. (This was well before Chicago became a city.) He was also a fur trader. Antoine would probably like this business card.

Roller-Coaster Inspector
Roller-Coaster Inspector © 2014 Vernon Brookins

Roller-Coaster Inspector

Riverview Park, which was at Belmont Avenue and Western Avenue on Chicago's, north side, had several, popular roller-coasters. Of course, they also have someone to inspect these rides. An inspector would probably like this business card.

Stone Mason Business Card
Stone Mason Business Card © 2014 Vernon Brookins

Stone Mason Business Card

Stone masons cut stone. One or more stone masons cut this stone bench which was at South Shore Country Club in Chicago when it was an exclusive, private club. Former or current stone masons may like this business card.

Telephone Booth Repairman
Telephone Booth Repairman © 2014 Vernon Brookins

Telephone Booth Repairman

In this era of cellphones, there are some people who are unfamiliar with telephone booths. Public phones were in these outdoor enclosures to allow callers privacy. These booths also somewhat protected callers from rainy and cold weather. When these booths' doors jammed, telephone booth repairman appeared to unjam them.

Trolley Car Inspector
Trolley Car Inspector © 2014 Vernon Brookins

Trolley Car Inspector

One of Chicago's, earliest forms of public transportation were the electric trolley cars. (The one pictured is at the Chicago History Museum.) Someone had to inspect these cars. Such a person would probably like this business card.

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