Skip to main content
  1. Life
  2. Neighborhoods
  3. Places & Faces

Nefertiti's golden spa returns to the South Carolina State Museum

See also

Want to be pampered like an Egyptian princess? Here’s your chance! On April 27 at 2 p.m., the South Carolina State Museum will host a day just for the girls with Nefertiti’s Golden Spa.

Spend a Saturday afternoon learning about the beauty secrets of ancient Egyptian women, including Nefertiti who was considered the most beautiful woman of her time. Guests will have the chance to make some luxurious concoctions, enjoy mini-treatments and tour the blockbuster exhibition, Tutankhamun: Return of the King.

This is one of several events the Museum has had or will have in connection with the King Tut exhibit. Ten years in the making, from the artisans of the Pharaonic Village in Egypt, the Field Museum, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, this dazzling collection of reproductions of Tutankhamun’s legendary treasures recreates the richest archaeological find of all time.

Cost of the event is $12 for the general public and $10 for Museum members. Be advised that the main entrance to the museum is closed due to construction. You may enter the building through the parking deck on the west, or river side of the building.

Check the list for some of the highlights of the King Tut exhibit

Become a friend or follower.

If you would like to receive email updates when new articles are posted, please click the "subscribe" button at the top of the page.

If you enjoyed this article, please check my Examiner page here.

Nefertiti
Nefertiti photo by author

Nefertiti

Nefertiti was a Queen of Egypt and reputedly was one of the most beautiful women of her time. This bust was a working model of a later work which explains why it has only one eye.

Tut's Funeral mask
Tut's Funeral mask photo by author

Tut's Funeral mask

tut's iconic Funeral Mask, which the Museum has used in its publicity, shows many symbols that were used to denote the power of Pharaoh. 

Canopic shrine
Canopic shrine photo by author

Canopic shrine

The canopic shrine, one of the most elaborate artifacts found in Tut's tomb, housed the liver, spleen, stomach and intestines of King Tut. These organs were believed to be the most essential by ancient Egyptians

Papyrus sandals
Papyrus sandals photo by author

Papyrus sandals

These papyrus sandals were worn by Pharaoh and depicted Pharaoh's enemies. Being in contact with the ground was, then as now, seen as a mark of disrespect in that part of the world.

Pharaoh's mummy
Pharaoh's mummy photo by author

Pharaoh's mummy

King tut's mummy, a replica decorated with gold and jewelry was made by craftsmen in Egypt who made faithful replicas of many of Tut's artifacts. After a world tour in the 1980s, the Egyptian government forbade the artifacts to leave Egypt as several were damaged.

Tut's Mummy case
Tut's Mummy case photo by author

Tut's Mummy case

Tut's mummy case again shows many of the symbols signifying the power of Pharaoh. On top are the falcon and the cobra, signifying Upper and Lower Egypt and also that Egypt was united at the time of Tut.

Advertisement

Life

  • Derek Hough
    Derek Hough brings quadruple threat talent to 'DWTS' and beyond
    Today's Buzz
  • Hookah smoking
    Young adults believe hookah smoking pose no health threat
    Camera
    7 Photos
  • Top outdoor activities
    Don't spend your summer indoors: Top outdoor activities to do with your significant other
    Camera
    10 Photos
  • Baby shower idea for men
    A new twist on baby showers is throwing a Daddy Baby-Q
    Camera
    7 Photos
  • Wedding special
    'Curvy Brides' offers a new look into every bride's pursuit for her picture perfect wedding gown
    Camera
    7 Photos
  • Morbid obesity
    Health: Morbid obesity decreases life span by up to 16 years
    Camera
    7 Photos