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Meet the five Guantanamo Bay detainees traded for POW

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The U.S. government traded five Guantanamo Bay detainees for U.S. Army Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl on Saturday. In the afternoon, Time said it "confirmed their [the detainees] identities with a senior administration official."

On April 24, 2011, Wikileaks began to publish secret files that profiled every Guantanamo Bay detainee. According to the files, the detainees exchanged today were all born in Afghanistan and members of the Taliban. All were held for about 12 years. And all of them were recommended for continued detention. They were all labeled as a high risk to the U.S., its interests, and allies. And one of them was directly connected to Osama bin Laden.

Examiner located the file and photo of each detainee.

Khirullah Said Wali Khairkhwa
Khirullah Said Wali Khairkhwa WikiLeaks/U.S. Government

Khirullah Said Wali Khairkhwa

Khirullah Said Wali Khairkhwa is about 47-years-old. On March 6, 2008, the government's Guantanamo Bay report said Khairkhwa was in good health.

According to the U.S. government:

Detainee was a senior Taliban official serving as the Minister of Interior, Governor of Herat, and a military commander.  Detainee was directly associated to Usama Bin Laden (UBL) and Taliban Supreme Commander Mullah Muhammad Omar, and was added to the UN financial freeze list.  Following the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks, detainee represented the Taliban during meetings with Iranian officials seeking to support hostilities against US and Coalition forces. 

Detainee also attended a meeting at the direction of UBL, reportedly accompanied by members of HAMAS. Detainee and his deputy were probably associated with a militant training camp in Herat operated by deceased al-Qaida commander (in Iraq) Abu Musab al-Zarqawi. Detainee was identified as a narcotics trafficker and probably used his position and influences to become one of the major opium drug lords in Western Afghanistan. Detainee probably used profits from drugs to promote Taliban interests in the area. JTF-GTMO determined this detainee to be: A HIGH risk, as he may pose a threat to the US, its interests and allies. A LOW threat from a detention perspective. Of HIGH intelligence value.

Mullah Norullah Noori
Mullah Norullah Noori WikiLeaks/U.S. Government

Mullah Norullah Noori

Mullah Norullah Noori is about 47-years-old. On Feb. 20, 2008, the government's Guantanamo Bay report said Noori was in good health. According to the U.S. government:

Detainee was a senior Taliban military commander in Mazar-e-Sharif during hostilities against US and Coalition forces in late 2001. Detainee was also the Taliban governor for the Balkh and Laghman provinces and is wanted by the United Nations (UN) for possible war crimes including the murder of thousands of Shiite Muslims. 

Detainee is associated with Supreme Taliban Commander Mullah Muhammad Omar, other senior Taliban officials, senior al-Qaida members and other extremist organizations and has remained a significant figure to Taliban supporters. Detainee’s brother is a Taliban commander directing operations against US and Coalition forces in Zabul Province where detainee resided. JTF-GTMO determined this detainee to be: A HIGH risk, as he is likely to pose a threat to the US, its interests and allies. A LOW threat from a detention perspective. Of HIGH intelligence value.

Noori is wanted by the United Nations for "possible war crimes including the murder of thousands of Shiites," according to the file.

Abdul Haq Wasiq
Abdul Haq Wasiq WikiLeaks/U.S. Government

Abdul Haq Wasiq

Abdul Haq Wasiq is about 43-years-old. On Jan. 21, 2008, the U.S. government's Guantanamo Bay report said Wasiq was in good health. According to the government:

Detainee served as the Taliban Deputy Minister of Intelligence. Detainee had direct access to Taliban and Hezb-e-Islami Gulbuddin (HIG) leadership. He was central to the Taliban’s efforts to form alliances with other Islamic fundamentalist groups to fight alongside the Taliban against US and Coalition forces after the 11 September 2001 attacks.

Detainee utilized his office to support al-Qaida and to assist Taliban personnel elude capture. Detainee arranged for al-Qaida personnel to train Taliban intelligence staff in intelligence methods. [ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THIS DETAINEE IS AVAILABLE IN AN SCI SUPPLEMENT.]  JTF-GTMO determined this detainee to be: A HIGH risk, as he is likely to pose a threat to the US, its interests and allies. A LOW threat from a detention perspective. Of HIGH intelligence value.

Mohammad Nabi Omari
Mohammad Nabi Omari WikiLeaks/U.S. Government

Mohammad Nabi Omari

Mohammad Nabi Omari is about 46-years-old. On Jan. 23, 2008, the U.S. government reported that Omari was in good health. According to the government:

Detainee was a senior Taliban official who served in multiple leadership roles. Detainee had strong operational ties to Anti-Coalition Militia (ACM) groups including al-Qaida, the Taliban, the Haqqani Network, and the Hezb-e-Islami Gulbuddin (HIG), some of whom remain active in ACM activities.

Detainee was a member of a joint al-Qaida/Taliban ACM cell in Khowst and was involved in attacks against US and Coalition forces. Detainee maintained weapons caches and facilitated the smuggling of fighters and weapons. JTF-GTMO determined this detainee to be: A HIGH risk, as he is likely to pose a threat to the US, its interests, and allies. A HIGH threat from a detention perspective. Of HIGH intelligence value.

Omari claimed he left the Taliban to become a used car salesman before he became an informant for the Central Intelligence Agency. The file said:

Detainee’s account is extensively composed of isolated facts, but he conspicuously avoids providing any information detailing his actions and relationships.  Detainee uses a CIA recruiter story which is of unknown credibility, to make him out to be an ally of America.

Mullah Mohammad Fazl
Mullah Mohammad Fazl WikiLeaks/U.S. Government

Mullah Mohammad Fazl

Mullah Mohammad Fazl is about 47-years-old. On Feb. 2008, the U.S. government reported that Fazl was in good health. According to the government:

Detainee was the Taliban Deputy Minister of Defense during Operation Enduring Freedom and is an admitted senior commander who served as Chief of Staff of the Taliban Army and as a commander of the 22nd Division. Detainee is wanted by the UN for possible war crimes including the murder of thousands of Shiites.

Detainee was associated with terrorist groups currently opposing US and Coalition forces including al-Qaida, Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU), Hezb-e-Islami Gulbuddin (HIG), and an Anti-Coalition Militia group known as Harakat-i-Inqilab-i-Islami. Detainee wielded considerable influence throughout the northern region of Afghanistan and his influence continued after his capture. Detainee’s name and capture have been used, in recruiting campaigns by the Taliban, and $500,000 US was paid to ensure detainees safe passage.  If released, detainee would likely rejoin the Taliban and establish ties with ACM elements participating in hostilities against US and Coalition forces in Afghanistan. JTF-GTMO determined this detainee to be: A HIGH risk, as he is likely to pose a threat to the US, its interests, and allies. A LOW threat from a detention perspective. Of HIGH intelligence value.

The file said that if released, Fazl would likely rejoin the Taliban and fight against U.S. and coalition forces.

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