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Maxed out on 'Big Politics': Supreme Court pushes the limit

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With the not unanimous decision by the Supreme Court to permit aggregated campaign contributions by wealthy persons and their entities, several things happened:

  1. American voters lost more equity and equality in the American Political System that is trending to being unfair.
  2. If Congress sees the problem, they must enact laws to restore the balance and fairness.
  3. Everyone, large and small donors are going to feel the “shakedown” and react to it.

See the annotated list.

The Politico story addresses the anticipated reaction among large donors. The universal reaction might well be “I’m tapped out.” That doesn’t mean that they are “maxed out.”

Is it a bad court? No, it is bad laws and regulation.

“Big donors fear shakedown after decision

By ANNA PALMER and TARINI PARTI | 4/2/14 7:36 PM EDT

The biggest Washington donors used to have a great excuse to keep their wallets closed when fundraisers came knocking: Sorry, I’m maxed out.

But a Supreme Court ruling swiped that line from them Wednesday when the justices tossed a rule that limited how much an individual can give to candidates, party committees and PACs.

Now, fundraisers hope donors, many of them lobbyists, will embrace their new legal right with gusto to give more across the board to candidates and party committees.

“I’m horrified, planning to de-list my phone number and destroy my email address,” said Ken Kies, who, along with his wife, has bumped up against the federal political contribution limits. “What I was really hoping for is a ban on lobbyists making contributions entirely.””

Read more: www.politico.com/story/2014/04/supreme-court-campaign-finance-donations-...

1. American voters lost more equity and equality in the American Political System that is trending to being unfair.
1. American voters lost more equity and equality in the American Political System that is trending to being unfair. www.demos.org

1. American voters lost more equity and equality in the American Political System that is trending to being unfair.

“If there is one idea that nearly all Americans can agree on, it is that everyone should have a chance to improve themselves and do better in life. At the same time, Americans strongly believe in political equality—the view that civic life should be a level playing field and everyone should have a voice in the decisions that affect their lives.
Yet today, there is wide recognition that America is not living up to either of these cornerstone ideals. A host of indicators show that the middle class is struggling—and worse, shrinking—and that upward mobility is elusive for many Americans. Meanwhile, evidence abounds that the U.S. political system is increasingly dominated by wealthy interests, and strong majorities of the public believe—rightly—that the deck is stacked against ordinary voters.
What is less understood, though, is the interplay between these two problems—the way that a tilting of political life toward business and the wealthy has served to undermine economic mobility.”

http://www.demos.org/stacked-deck-how-dominance-politics-affluent-business-undermines-economic-mobility-america

2. If Congress sees the problem, they must enact laws to restore the balance and fairness.
2. If Congress sees the problem, they must enact laws to restore the balance and fairness. www.freep.com

2. If Congress sees the problem, they must enact laws to restore the balance and fairness.

“Watchdog Says High Court Is ‘Destroying’ Campaign Finance Laws

The Supreme Court has struck down limits in federal law on the overall campaign contributions the biggest individual donors may make to candidates, political parties and political action committees (PACs).
The justices say Americans have a right to give the legal maximum to candidates, and to parties and PACs, without worrying they will violate the law by bumping up against a limit on all contributions.

The decision does not undermine limits on individual contributions to candidates for president or Congress, now $2,600 an election.”

http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2014/04/02/mccutcheon-campaign-finance

3. Everyone, large and small donors are going to feel the “shakedown” and react to it.
3. Everyone, large and small donors are going to feel the “shakedown” and react to it. fineartamerica.com

3. Everyone, large and small donors are going to feel the “shakedown” and react to it.

“At least 372 fundraising events have been scheduled since Jan. 1, according to the Sunlight Foundation, with 38 of them planned for this week alone.

But lobbyists who help lawmakers in their dash for cash are quick to note that they don’t command the same financial resources as the ultra-wealthy donors who power outside groups. The cap on campaign contributions — which was set at $123,200 for the 2014 cycle — has given them a ready-made excuse for turning down fundraising appeals.
“I like the limit because it gives me an excuse not to give more,” said one Republican lobbyist. “If there was no limit, I would give more. Not $100,000 more, but more like $40,000 or $50,000 more.”

Tony Podesta, who is a major Democratic fundraiser and chairman of the Podesta Group, said ending the cap would likely increase the pressure on lobbyists to pony up.”

http://thehill.com/business-a-lobbying/284817-lobbyists-fear-shakedown-if-court-lifts-campaign-cap#ixzz2xomXJHn9

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