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Lily Allen releases "Sheezus": a look back at her videography

Brit Awards 2014
Brit Awards 2014
Photo by Dan Kitwood

Lily Allen's videos have always been as in your face and poignant as her crass lyrics. From her debut single "Smile" with its angry and revengeful music video where Lily poisons a mate and pays people to make his life unbearable, to the current female popstar questioning on the new album's leading track.

Yesterday, two weeks before the new album is released, they uploaded the new music video for title track "Sheezus". The album is her third studio album. This is the fifth official/buzz single from Sheezus.

Between the three albums, she has sixteen solo singles and six collaborations. Most of the singles had music videos and here is the list of all of them.

"Smile"
"Smile" Photo by Tim P. Whitby/Getty Images

"Smile"

The debut single, [["Smile"]], was her first number-one in the UK. The track hit the Hot 100 in the US. The song spent two weeks on top in the UK and went on to be certified gold. The video is bright and cheeky as she basks in the aftermath of a relationship gone wrong and wanting to find fulfillment in her former boyfriend's misery.

"LDN"
"LDN" Tim P. Whitby/Getty Images

"LDN"

The second single describes London-city life from Lily's perspective. Despite her lyrical warning 'If you look twice, you can see it's all lies', she eventually adds 'Why, oh, why, would I want to be anywhere else?'. [["LDN"]] hit number six in the UK. The video is just as bright and cheeky as the previous. Everything she describes and sees ahead of her is beautiful and kind, and as she passes the hilariously-described sights, the viewer can see the dark and gloom behind her as she skips and dances around London.

"Littlest Things"
"Littlest Things" Tim P. Whitby/Getty Images

"Littlest Things"

This is probably the sweetest video Lily has ever had. [["Littlest Things"]] is a song about reminiscing after a relationship ending and thus having the person's memories hover every day of life. The black and white, cinematographic-esque video is simply, elegant and probably the most mundane of her videography.

The song hit #21 in the UK.

"Alfie"
"Alfie" Ian Gavan/Getty Images

"Alfie"

The single hit #15 in the UK. The lyrics are about Lily's brother. After the song was released she responded by saying 'When I wrote [["Alfie"]], nobody really knew who I was. At first he was really upset about it, because he thought that I was just pointing out all of his bad points and attacking him. I thought it was really flattering. I thought he'd be really, really happy because it proved to him how much I loved him, that I care about him, and I want him to do something with his life. I suppose his paranoia — induced by smoking so much weed — made him think, 'Why are you trying to be mean?''

The video brings Lily back to a bright world where her brother is played by a puppet. Of it she described the experience 'I did a video shoot for the next single, which is Alfie, and that was quite a lot of fun, Alfie was played by a puppet and the whole thing looks like an episode of a mixture Tom and Jerry and Roger Rabbit, you'll understand when you see it. The whole day was a pleasurable experience'.

"Oh My God"
"Oh My God" Ben A. Pruchnie/Getty Images

"Oh My God"

Despite "Alfie" having an A-side release, "Shame on You", Lily's next release with a music video was as a featured artist with Mark Ronson. [["Oh My God"]] is a cover of Kaiser Chiefs. The song hit #8 in the UK.

The music video has Lily play a Jessica Rabbit type cartoon character as the performer in a bar. The Kaiser Chiefs themselves make a cameo in the video.

"Drivin' Me Wild"
"Drivin' Me Wild" Scott Gries/Getty Images

"Drivin' Me Wild"

The next single release and music video came in the form of a Common track [["Drivin' Me Wild"]]. The single hit #56 in the UK. The song's lyrics talk about the pressures to be the epitome of a female and a male in current US popular culture which is fame-obsessed.

The video sees Lily on the streets and wearing an astronaut suit.

"The Fear"
"The Fear" Anthony Harvey/Getty Images

"The Fear"

The lead single of the second album was another number-one in the UK for Lily. [["The Fear"]] spent four weeks on top. The song hit the top spot of the Dance Chart in the US.

The video is larger than life and an extravagant creation which enhances the lyrical content of fearing consumerist-culture.

"Not Fair"
"Not Fair" Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

"Not Fair"

The second official release of It's Not Me, It's You, was a somewhat controversial track whose lyrics were altered for radio play and promotional performances. [["Not Fair"]] depicts a relationship where the man is loving and great, yet his sexual drive (and genitals) is less than impressive.

The music video is an ode to country performers as Lily performs with a live band.

"F**k You"
"F**k You" Ian Gavan/Getty Images

"F**k You"

[["F**k You"]] was released internationally. The lyrics deal with (mostly American) politics and queer rights. The track hit number-one on the Dance US Chart and all over the world.

The video is from the perspective of the camera who is supposed to be Allen as she goes about her day. Eventually, she begins (with her fingers) to manipulate those around to amuse her.

"22"
"22" Ian Gavan/Getty Images

"22"

[["22"]] hit #14 in the UK. The song discusses the idea which states culture and society telling females that they are only good as visual objects and that if they hit a certain age, the only thing they have to offer is being a wife.

The music video sees Lily in a bathroom of a bar or discoteque before and after being part of the nightlife for years and how women are made to compete, discard and let go of each other and their dreams.

"Who'd Have Known"
"Who'd Have Known" Kris Connor/Getty Images

"Who'd Have Known"

The single hit #39. The music video for [["Who'd Have Known"]] was released after her public feud with Elton John at the GQ Awards. As Lily would, she took a very sweet love song and turned the video into a mocking ode to Sir Elton John. She plays the part of an obsessed fan.

The chorus eventually was sampled and she was credited on T-Pain featuring Whiz Khalifa's "5 O'Clock" in 2011.

"Just Be Good to Green"
"Just Be Good to Green" Ian Gavan/Getty Images

"Just Be Good to Green"

"Just Be Good to Green" featuring track lead by Professor Green hit #5 in the UK. The video is a simple set where the two sing with backing dancers.

"True Love"
"True Love" Larry Busacca/Getty Images

"True Love"

This P!nk track was released in 2013. It hit #16 in the UK and #53 in the US. The video for [["True Love"]] sees P!nk with her daughter and husband as she performs and promotes her work. Lily is part of it as she blends some vegetables.

"Somewhere Only We Know"
"Somewhere Only We Know" Samir Hussein/Getty Images

"Somewhere Only We Know"

This cover of Keane's [["Somewhere Only We Know"]] stayed at number-one for three weeks in 2013 on the UK chart. The gorgeous and sweet animation which is part of the video shows a making of the John Lewis advert which used the track during the holidays.

"Hard Out Here"
"Hard Out Here" Anthony Harvey/Getty Images

"Hard Out Here"

"Hard Out Here" hit #6 in the UK, #1 in Austria and hit the top 10 in Germany and Switzerland. The music video, criticized for its lazy racial standard as it questioned rap and hip-hop visual culture, is a poppy dance environment where Lily discusses the pressures of being back in the spotlight. Lyrically, it goes after the success of the Robin Thicke, TI and Pharrell Williams hit "Blurred Lines" which most saw as an ode to rape-culture. Visual, it plays off "Lines" but also Miley Cyrus' "We Can't Stop" where she utilizes black individuals to give her musical-street credibility.

"Air Balloon"
"Air Balloon" Tim P. Whitby/Getty Images

"Air Balloon"

[["Air Balloon"]] is a breezy summer track which was released in the UK, upping "Out Here" with a peak at #6. The video is gorgeously put-together, with a very bright blue and green cinematography which sees her dancing around in nature with animals as the camera zooms in and out of close-ups and extreme shots of earth from space.

Lily discusses Kurt Cobain and Elvis as she makes faces at the camera. If you see Allen floating in space at the end, you will also see a crucifix with Jesus floating about with her.

"Our Time"
"Our Time" Scott Heavey/Getty Images

"Our Time"

Lily's latest buzz single, [["Our Time"]], is a mellow dance track. The music video starts with her on the telephone informing a friend 'I am coming. But I am only staying for one'. Eventually, she goes on a cab and three friends, all played by Lily, begin drinking and dancing to the music. After a girl dressed in a hotdog uniform fights with another friend, they all wind up inside the cab. Once the morning comes, Lily exists the cab telling the driver 'I can't find any money' and stumbling about the pavement, goes home.

"Sheezus"
"Sheezus" Kevin Winter/Getty Images

"Sheezus"

The latest release from the new album is the title track, [["Sheezus"]]. The video is simplistic in its treatment, but the effects are alluring. It depicts Lily singing along to the lyrics as colors, shapers and effects help her transition from verse to verse. 

Her eyes are devilishly colored to enhance the sentiment as she asks to be 'your leader. Let me be Sheezus'. The chorus is full of her thoughts about contemporaries like Rihanna, Katy Perry, Lady Gaga, Lorde and Beyonce.