Skip to main content

See also:

Immigration: Not much elasticity

Jeh Johnson is on point for The White House
Jeh Johnson is on point for The White HousePhoto by Scott Olson/Getty Images

If Americans want to preserve and improve upon the nation’s quality of life, it must enact policies that enforce laws that produce specific outcomes. It cannot be left to chance or accident. Historical circumstances are not the basis for sound future policy. America has reached the limit.

Rarely do Americans decide issues intelligently, based on factual reasoning and sound ideas. Does anyone want to debate that? “Immigration policy reform” is an instance. Immigration policy on which the nation was founded became obsolete at some point along the timeline. At various stages in history, legislators made adjustments. However, on what do they base policy? What are the economics of immigration in the context of present economics? Addressing these questions in context of Americans as global citizens is no easy task, and introduces distasteful choices. That is what makes it politically difficult.

Philip Bump writes in the Washington Post, “The Fix” today that “Americans turn against immigration.” He analyzes the data. Immigration isn’t a matter of public opinion (see the link). Immigration policy should be a matter of economics and sustainability. When elected representatives fail to keep Americans informed of the facts, and when they fail to properly enforce the laws, they produce failing outcomes. While the opinions are circumstantial, the facts remain. Here is a list.

  1. There is a finite and optimal limit to the number of immigrants needed and wanted by the nation.
  2. The demographics of the number of immigrants needed and wanted is most important to effecting desired outcomes.
  3. Illegal immigration undermines the rule of law.
  4. Immigration policy must be managed in context with foreign policy.
  5. America has an illegal immigrant problem that is the result from past and present mistakes by government elected officials.
  6. It is essential to establish outcome-driven immigration policy reform and management.

The annotated details are shown below.

“Americans turn against immigration — but, as always, it’s complicated

BY PHILIP BUMP June 27 at 10:39 AM

Over the past 15 years, America has steadily warmed to the idea of increased immigration. In 1999, 10 percent of the country wanted to see more immigration. In 2014, that figure is up to 22 percent. But, as new data from Gallup shows, the country on the whole remains skeptical about more immigration, including a sharp turn against an increase over the past year.

As always, the chart says more than any words.

Diving into the numbers, Gallup speculates that the slow trend upward for an increase is driven in part by a push from business groups (including Mark Zuckerberg's Facebook) for more H-1B visas, allowing more skilled workers to immigrate. It's people with post-graduate degrees that have become more likely to support an increase, who, Gallup says, are "more likely to be tuned in to the discussion about the need for importing highly skilled workers."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-fix/wp/2014/06/27/americans-turn-against-immigration-but-as-always-its-complicated/?wpisrc=nl_fix

1. There is a finite and optimal limit to the number of immigrants needed and wanted by the nation.
1. There is a finite and optimal limit to the number of immigrants needed and wanted by the nation. Getty Images

1. There is a finite and optimal limit to the number of immigrants needed and wanted by the nation.

“About 88,000 foreigners arrive in the United States on a typical day. Most are welcomed at airports and borders, and most do not intend to stay in the United States. 82,000 nonimmigrant foreigners per day come to the United States as tourists, business visitors, students, and foreign workers. Another 2,200 arrivals are immigrants and refugees, persons that the United States has invited to join American society as permanent residents. The other 4,100 are unauthorized or illegal foreigners—some enter legally as tourists and then stay in the United States, but most enter the country unlawfully by eluding border patrol agents or using false documents to circumvent border inspectors.”

http://www.hoover.org/research/making-and-remaking-america-immigration-united-states

2. The demographics of the number of immigrants needed and wanted is most important to effecting desired outcomes.
2. The demographics of the number of immigrants needed and wanted is most important to effecting desired outcomes. STRDEL/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

2. The demographics of the number of immigrants needed and wanted is most important to effecting desired outcomes.

“The United States has a total fertility rate close to replacement level (TFR = 2.03).
However, substantial differences exist between states, with relatively high levels in  9
the southern states and relatively low levels in states of the Northeast. The birth rate in
Utah is twice as high as the one in Vermont. Appreciable differences exist also
according to ethnic-racial groups. The population of Hispanic origin has a TFR = 2.7
(Ventura et al., 2003) and the Black-Non-Hispanic population has a TFR = 2.1
whereas the total fertility rate of the White (Non-Hispanic) population (TFR = 1.8) is
similar to the one found in some northern European countries and in France. Canada
(TFR = 1.5) falls within the middle of the range of the western European levels.”

http://undesadspd.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=wclbstPFzJo%3D&tabid=282

3. Illegal immigration undermines the rule of law.
3. Illegal immigration undermines the rule of law. TIM SLOAN/AFP/Getty Images

3. Illegal immigration undermines the rule of law.

“Rewarding Illegal Aliens: Senate Bill Undermines The Rule of Law

By Kris W. Kobach, D.Phil., J.D. and Matthew Spalding, Ph.D.

The most controversial component of the Senate's Secure Borders, Economic Opportunity and immigration Reform Act of 2007 is Title VI, euphemistically entitled "Nonimmigrants in the United States Previously in Unlawful Status." It would create a new "Z" visa exclusively for illegal aliens. This title would change the status of those who are here illegally to legal, essentially granting amnesty to those "previously in unlawful status." This seriously flawed proposal would undermine the rule of law by granting massive benefits to those who have willfully violated U.S. laws, while denying those benefits to those who have played by the rules and sometimes even to U.S. citizens.”

http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2007/05/rewarding-illegal-aliens-senate-bill-undermines-the-rule-of-law

4. Immigration policy must be managed in context with foreign policy.
4. Immigration policy must be managed in context with foreign policy. Screenshot, http://www.whitehouse.gov/issues/immigration

4. Immigration policy must be managed in context with foreign policy.

“Immigration policy is foreign policy

Illegal immigration is seen as a domestic policy issue, and it certainly is one. But when it comes to illegal immigration, there is no clear line between foreign and domestic policy. On the one hand, the challenge of having uncounted millions of undocumented aliens working, residing, and having families in the United States simply has not been dealt with head-on. On the other hand, America has long devoted its, time, energy, personnel and financial resources to the development or reconstruction of other nations, whether in Africa, southeastern Europe or the Middle East and Central Asia. Yet it is the lopsided economic condition of so many states south of America’s border that has led to the mass migration that is now seen as a major domestic challenge for Washington.”

http://nationalinterest.org/commentary/immigration-policy-is-foreign-policy-7727

5. America has an illegal immigrant problem that is the result from past and present mistakes by government elected officials.
5. America has an illegal immigrant problem that is the result from past and present mistakes by government elected officials. Win McNamee/Getty Images

5. America has an illegal immigrant problem that is the result from past and present mistakes by government elected officials.

“llegal immigration imposes enormous costs -- monetary as well as crime-related -- on American society. As regards criminal activity, Manhattan Institute scholar Heather MacDonald describes one small slice of a much larger problem:

In Los Angeles, 95 percent of all outstanding warrants for homicide target illegal aliens, as do approximately two-thirds of all fugitive felony warrants.

More  than 60 percent of the Hispanic gangs in Southern California—whose membership  is in the tens of thousands—is illegal. These gangs involved with drug-distribution schemes, extortion, drive-by assassinations, assaults, and robberies.”

http://www.discoverthenetworks.org/viewSubCategory.asp?id=196

6. It is essential to establish outcome-driven immigration policy reform and management.
6. It is essential to establish outcome-driven immigration policy reform and management. Getty Images

6. It is essential to establish outcome-driven immigration policy reform and management.

“It is highly doubtful that anyone in Congress, the body charged with setting immigration rules, can clearly define what the policy is meant to achieve. And even if someone has given enough thought to the matter to be able to articulate policy goals, it is highly unlikely that there would be any sort of consensus on those goals.

Absent a well thought-out rationale for immigration, platitudes and nostalgia have become the governing philosophy. As best anyone can tell, we have immigration today because we are a "nation of immigrants." Consequently, immigration seems to be defining the nation, by default, rather than the nation defining the role of immigration by a well-reasoned assessment of how this policy will serve its interests.”

http://cis.org/articles/2001/blueprints/stein.html