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How to keep your kids’ drug free

21.4 percent of 12th graders admitted to smoking a hookah in the past year.
21.4 percent of 12th graders admitted to smoking a hookah in the past year.
Yancey Media Consultants

Students and drug use is on the rise. The increase in the number of young people using drugs coincides with the marijuana controversy in the news and on the political front. The daily use of marijuana amongst twelfth graders is up 6.5 percent. Young people are listening to the media reports that marijuana may be helpful because it is now legal in some states for medicinal purposes. This trend may continue to increase as more states legalize marijuana for recreational use.

Prescription drugs such as Adderall, a medication used for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is on the rise by high school students. Although cigarette smoking is declining the use of hookah water pipes and smoking small cigars is increasing. According to Drugfacts, 21.4 percent of 12th graders admitted to smoking a hookah in the past year. In addition, designer drugs such as 251, Nombi or Smiles are on the rise. This is a psychedelic drug which mimics LSD. The drug can be ingested or by just touching a paper that the drug has touched may have serious effects on the individual.

Here are some ways to keep your kids’ drug free.

Know what your child is doing. If you don’t know, they can’t go.

Talk to and with your child. What time can we go get a hamburger and talk?

Be involved in your child’s life. What can I do to help you?

Praise your child. Well done!

Set limits. We agree that you will be home by 9 or no weekend privileges.

Despite the fact that student drug abuse has declined in some areas, the statistics are still disturbing. Enjoy spending as much time with your child as possible!

1.  Know what your child is doing.
1. Know what your child is doing. drugsfacts.com

1. Know what your child is doing.

Work out a schedule with your child so that everyone knows where your child is supposed to be at all times. Keep the schedule posted with times, dates, addresses, cell numbers and names of those hosting or attending the event or outing. Share with your child that it is important to know where they are at all times for safety reasons and not because you do not trust them.

2. Talk to and with your child.
2. Talk to and with your child. upi.com

2. Talk to and with your child.

Arrange a special date time with your child. Form an open relationship with your child so that they can tell you anything and you will work with them through it without anger or judgment. Arrange a special date with a consistent time and day at least once a week that they know is their time with you. This can just be 5 or 10 minutes of your time that belongs only to that individual child. Let them decide what they want to talk about. If there is something that is bothering you this is the time to share it with your child.

3. Be involved in your child’s life.
3. Be involved in your child’s life. dtinews

3. Be involved in your child’s life.

Tell your child how you would like to be involved in their lives. You might want to organize the refreshments after the sports activities or host the cooking club. Volunteer to drive or chaperone dances and other outings. Make an effort to meet your child’s friends. Let your child know that you will be involved in their lives and activities and ask how they would like you to be involved and follow through.

4. Praise your child.
4. Praise your child. psychologytoday

4. Praise your child.

Building self-confidence in your child is important. When they are following directions and making positive progress let them know that you care and that you are proud. Encourage them when they are doing a great job by telling them and cheer them when they are having a bad day. Sing their praises.

5. Set limits.
5. Set limits. theparentsuccess.coach

5. Set limits.

It is important to set clear rules and regulations with your child. Involve them in the development of the rules. Specific rules and consequences should be made clear to the child for infractions or violations of the rules.