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Five money management books that won't bore your teenager

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Managing money is not a topic many teens are interested in, but learning basic ways to manage money is important during the teenage years and sets the stage for a sound financial future as an adult. These five books teach teenagers about all facets of financial management and are written to be interesting to teens or offer many examples of applying the principles taught without boring or overwhelming the reader.

Each of these books can be found in book stores and online at Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com, in paperback and electronic book formats for Kindle or Nook.

The Complete Guide to Personal Finance: For Teenagers
The Complete Guide to Personal Finance: For Teenagers Atlantic Publishing Company

The Complete Guide to Personal Finance: For Teenagers

The Complete Guide to Personal Finance: For Teenagers presents teens with a well-rounded discussion of all things personal finance. The book provides more complete information about money management that pertains to teens while giving brief explanations of financial issues that will be a concern into adulthood. Teens get the information they need now to make sound financial management decisions while not being overwhelmed with information that does not yet pertain to them.

The author of the book, by Tamsen Butler, explains saving, budgeting, taxes, credit cards, debit card and other common personal finance topics, and includes an extensive reference glossary of financial terms. She also includes discussions about behavioral finance, something not often found in personal finance books. Teens learn how to separate needs from wants to prevent overspending, identify common financial mistakes and how learn from them, and how to avoid the trap of consumerism and peer pressure when it comes to spending decisions. Butler add adds a few words about the economy as well.

The Motley Fool Investment Guide for Teens: 8 Steps to Having More Money Than Your Parents Ever Dreamed Of
The Motley Fool Investment Guide for Teens: 8 Steps to Having More Money Than Your Parents Ever Dreamed Of Amazon.com

The Motley Fool Investment Guide for Teens: 8 Steps to Having More Money Than Your Parents Ever Dreamed Of

Despite the title of this book, it has quite a bit of personal finance information for teens as well as explaining investing in easily understood terms.  The Motley Fool Investment Guide for Teens was written by spirited and witty financial writers Dave and Tom Gardner along with dozens of teens who asked and answered questions to put together a book on realistic money management and investing for that age group.

After learning about setting goals and determining steps to achieve financial goals, the book assists teens with finding companies that appeal to them and that make tracking a portfolio fun. The book explains stocks, mutual funds and other investments and includes worksheets and websites teens can visit for more information about investing and managing money.

 
Clark Howard's Living Large for the Long Haul: Consumer-Tested Ways to Overhaul Your Finances, Increase Your Savings, and Get Your Life Back on Track
Clark Howard's Living Large for the Long Haul: Consumer-Tested Ways to Overhaul Your Finances, Increase Your Savings, and Get Your Life Back on Track ClarkHoward.com

Clark Howard's Living Large for the Long Haul: Consumer-Tested Ways to Overhaul Your Finances, Increase Your Savings, and Get Your Life Back on Track

While this book was not written specifically for teens, it is written in very easy-to-understand terms and is packed with common sense thinking about personal finance that can help to form a healthy attitude about money. Clark Howard's Living Large for the Long Haul shares stories of real people who are thriving financially and then adds Clark's commentary on what they have done right and what they could improve on. Teens can learn from these examples and actually apply sound financial practices to their lives now and into the future.

Why Didn't They Teach Me This in School?: 99 Personal Money Management Principles to Live By
Why Didn't They Teach Me This in School?: 99 Personal Money Management Principles to Live By Amazon.com

Why Didn't They Teach Me This in School?: 99 Personal Money Management Principles to Live By

It may sound overwhelming to read about 99 principles, but this book is actually fairly short and could even be read in one sitting. Originally written for his five children as they graduated from high school or college, Cary Siegel has broken down personal finance into eight sections: Life Lessons, Budgeting and Saving, Spending, Debt and Credit Cards, Investing, Housing, Insurance and Quick Tips. Specific money management advice is provided in two-page-or-less subtopics under each section, making for easy reading while learning specific financial advice and personal advice that affects finances but most people don't think about until it's too late.

Why Didn't They Teach Me This in School?: 99 Personal Money Management Principles to Live By doesn't teach a lot of details, but it's easy to get deeper into financial management by reading other books. This book teaches about finances based on real life concerns.

What Color Is Your Parachute? for Teens, Second Edition
What Color Is Your Parachute? for Teens, Second Edition Ten Speed Press

What Color Is Your Parachute? for Teens, Second Edition

While this book is not specifically about money management, it will help a teen with decisions about earning money. What Color Is Your Parachute? by Richard Bolles is a best selling book that has been released annually to help people with career and education decisions while taking into account the most recent changes in workforce developments. Bolles teams up with Carol Christen to write a version of this book for teenagers.

What Color Is Your Parachute? for Teens, Second Edition helps with discovering jobs and careers that are interesting to the individual, what is important to do in high school and college to achieve career goals and help with landing a job. Christen says on her website, "Parachute for Teens also has a message of hope. No matter who you are, if you have a plan to patiently build a body of knowledge and experience according to your career goals, you will continue to gain the qualifications for jobs that would be your dream to do."

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