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Feminine forms take shape at the Scope Gallery

1. "3 Sisters: Corn, Bean and Squash" trio of hand-sculpted forms on a granite base by Christine Moerenhout-Hubloue of McLean, Va
Christine Moerenhout-Hubloue

There is nothing more graceful than feminine beauty in its various shapes and forms. With pottery and ceramics like this, the work speaks for itself. Let Mother Earth have a ball, and leave the game at the park to see some fine art in clay.

Tracy Griffith describes it best:

“Forms and figures have become distinctly feminine, shedding angles for curves, foliage for flowers and massive bulk for graceful linear sensibilities. A knockout of a vase reflects bursts of crystalline light in porcelain. A dishy dish with earthy embossing emphasizes linear waves of design. Forms are flared, divas and lookers with commanding presence. Colors are ethereal, soft seafoam, or jewellike with glassy emerald. Sculptures show feminine bonds with substantive forms and dynamic gesture. Crackled raku baby polar bears follow their mother. Stalwart sisters stand together, hair whipped back by the wind.

  • Hourglass forms, spiraled knobs and lace embossing are in.
  • Flowing glazes are the new hue.
  • Smooth tapering and delicate edges are the trendy silhouettes of today.

Clay artists have used feminine wiles, creating allure that attracts the everyone's better half.”

Traci Griffith Tso

List of four artists’ work to see at The Scope Gallery:

1. "3 Sisters: Corn, Bean and Squash" trio of hand-sculpted forms on a granite base by Christine Moerenhout-Hubloue of McLean, Va

2. Baby polar bears trail after mother: Raku-fired crackle glazed sculptures on a natural slate base by Heidi Schramm of Arlington

3. High-fire golden hourglass vase by Klaudia Levin of Silver Spring, Md.

4. Handsculpted stoneware Guinea Piggy Bank "Ginger" by Tracie Griffith Tso of Reston, Va

Scope Gallery's Ceramic Guild show runs April 28 to June 1 and is in conjunction with the Art League Gallery's "Art and Feminism" show; hours are Monday throughSunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., with Thursdays open until 9 p.m. The gallery is located at 105 North Union Street, ground floor Studio 19, Alexandria, VA. 22314. For further information, call Scope Gallery at 703-548-6288 or visit www.torpedofactory.org/galleries/scope.

The Ceramic Guild is an organization of over 40 juried Washington D.C. area artists working in the clay medium. Organization members exhibit themed shows every other month at the artist-run cooperative Scope Gallery in Alexandria's Torpedo Factory Art Center.

The Scope Gallery at the Torpedo Factory
Gallery Hours:
10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Daily
10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Thursdays
105 North Union Street
Alexandria, Virginia 22314

1. "3 Sisters: Corn, Bean and Squash" trio of hand-sculpted forms on a granite base by Christine Moerenhout-Hubloue of McLean, Va
1. "3 Sisters: Corn, Bean and Squash" trio of hand-sculpted forms on a granite base by Christine Moerenhout-Hubloue of McLean, Va Christine Moerenhout-Hubloue

1. "3 Sisters: Corn, Bean and Squash" trio of hand-sculpted forms on a granite base by Christine Moerenhout-Hubloue of McLean, Va

“Christine Moerenhout – Hubloue

Born and raised in Belgium, I moved to the U.S.A. in 1985 leaving family and a professional career behind me. Inspired by the Native Americans’ ability to create art and cultural heritage from clay, I became obsessed with its infinite possibilities as a way of communicating and expressing myself. Art Nouveau and Art Deco, omnipresent in my background are major influences as well as personal experiences which lead to strong emotions reflected in my work. Clay is the medium from which I draw strength and comfort and which gives me peace and contentment in life.”

The Kiln Club

2. Baby polar bears trail after mother: Raku-fired crackle glazed sculptures on a natural slate base by Heidi Schramm of Arlington
2. Baby polar bears trail after mother: Raku-fired crackle glazed sculptures on a natural slate base by Heidi Schramm of Arlington Heidi Schramm

2. Baby polar bears trail after mother: Raku-fired crackle glazed sculptures on a natural slate base by Heidi Schramm of Arlington

“Heidi Schramm

I work in porcelain, stoneware, and Raku, on the potters wheel, hand building and sometimes combine both methods. Raku is my favorite method of firing. The unpredictability of this method and the relatively quick results appeal to me. Finally, I like to finish my pieces by attaching driftwood, roots, bamboo and found objects.”

The Kiln Club

3. HIgh-fire golden hourglass vase by Klaudia Levin of Silver Spring, Md.
3. HIgh-fire golden hourglass vase by Klaudia Levin of Silver Spring, Md. Klaudia Levin

3. HIgh-fire golden hourglass vase by Klaudia Levin of Silver Spring, Md.

“Klaudia Levin

I think of the flow from inside a pot to the outside. I think of the relationship of the foot to the rim, and the intangible importance of the weightiness. Typically I start with a new concept, and then I implement the idea through several versions of the object. A well balanced pot lets my eyes move and gives me a feeling of freedom.

I received most of my training at the ceramic studio at Harvard, where I worked for 11 years. In 2009 I joined the studios at Lee Art Center. I am a jury-in member at the Torpedo Factory.”

The Kiln Club

4. Handsculpted stoneware Guinea Piggy Bank "Ginger" by Tracie Griffith Tso of Reston, Va
4. Handsculpted stoneware Guinea Piggy Bank "Ginger" by Tracie Griffith Tso of Reston, Va Tracie Griffith Tso

4. Handsculpted stoneware Guinea Piggy Bank "Ginger" by Tracie Griffith Tso of Reston, Va

“Tracie Griffith Tso

Griffith Tso began studying Chinese brushwork at age 12 and specializes in spontaneous flower-bird painting. A native Californian, Griffith Tso teaches and lectures about Chinese brush painting nationwide and has expanded her traditional repertoire, transitioning classic ink-and-rice-paper brushwork onto functional brown and white stoneware forms. Her creative compositions include praying mantises, bunnies, bamboo, horses, cranes, koi, pandas, orchids, chicks, songbirds and flowers. She and her husband reside in Reston along with her muse and rabbit, Rembrandt.”

The Kiln Club