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F.K. Sweet students’ patriotic work on U.S. iconic symbols

We never stop learning if we reach out to learn.
We never stop learning if we reach out to learn.
Photo by Sarah Glenn/Getty Images

What better way for all of us to seek our destiny than by reviewing and observing the past. St. Lucie County School District’s F. K. Sweet Elementary School students Shadalou Fernandez, Danielle Murray, Kate Bachmeyer, and Lani’ Chambers were announced as winners in a recent patriotic art contest at the school. Participating students learned the history of many American symbols as they completed their patriotic drawings.

As part of the contest at Francis K. Sweet Elementary School-- kindergarten, first and second grade students studied the Liberty Bell; third and fourth grade students learned about the nation’s first flag; and fifth grade students learned about the iconic Rosie The Riveter character from World War II; students included an essay with their art. We never stop learning if we reach out to learn. See attached list with interesting information on the Liberty Bell, Betsy Ross (first U.S. flag), and Rosie the Riveter.

REF: Lucie Links Newsletter (SLCSD) Jan. 2013

Link: http://www.examiner.com/user-tbmyers21

THE LIBERTY BELL
THE LIBERTY BELL Photobucket

THE LIBERTY BELL

 

The Bell's Message

The Liberty Bell's inscription conveys a message of liberty which goes beyond the words themselves. Since the bell was made, the words of the inscription have meant different things to different people. When William Penn created Pennsylvania's government he allowed citizens to take part in making laws and gave them the right to choose the religion they wanted. The colonists were proud of the freedom that Penn gave them. In 1751, the Speaker of the Pennsylvania Assembly ordered a new bell for the State House. He asked that a Bible verse to be placed on the bell - "Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the Land unto all the inhabitants thereof" (Leviticus 25:10). As the official bell of the Pennsylvania State House (today called Independence Hall) it rang many times for public announcements. The old State House bell was first called the "Liberty Bell" by a group trying to outlaw slavery. These abolitionists remembered the words on the bell and, in the 1830s, adopted it as a symbol of their cause. Beginning in the late 1800s, the Liberty Bell traveled around the country to expositions and fairs to help heal the divisions of the Civil War. It reminded Americans of their earlier days when they fought and worked together for independence. In 1915, the bell made its last trip and came home to Philadelphia, where it now silently reminds us of the power of liberty. For more than 200 years people from around the world have felt the bell's message. No one can see liberty, but people have used the Liberty Bell to represent this important idea.

 

REF:  http://www.nps.gov/inde/liberty-bell-center.htm

 

BETSY ROSS AND THE AMERICAN FLAG
BETSY ROSS AND THE AMERICAN FLAG Photobucket

BETSY ROSS AND THE AMERICAN FLAG

 

Betsy would often tell her children, grandchildren, relatives, and friends of the fateful day when three members of a secret committee from the Continental Congress came to call upon her. Those representatives, George Washington, Robert Morris, and George Ross, asked her to sew the first flag. This meeting occurred in her home some time late in May 1776. George Washington was then the head of the Continental Army. Robert Morris, an owner of vast amounts of land, was perhaps the wealthiest citizen in the Colonies. Colonel George Ross was a respected Philadelphian and also the uncle of her late husband, John Ross.

Naturally, Betsy Ross already knew George Ross as she had married his nephew. Furthermore, Betsy was also acquainted with the great General Washington. Not only did they both worship at Christ Church in Philadelphia, but Betsy's pew was next to George and Martha Washington's pew. Her daughter recalled, "That she was previously well acquainted with Washington, and that he had often been in her house in friendly visits, as well as on business. That she had embroidered ruffles for his shirt bosoms and cuffs, and that it was partly owing to his friendship for her that she was chosen to make the flag."

In June 1776, brave Betsy was a widow struggling to run her own upholstery business. Upholsterers in colonial America not only worked on furniture but did all manner of sewing work, which for some included making flags. According to Betsy, General Washington showed her a rough design of the flag that included a six-pointed star. Betsy, a standout with the scissors, demonstrated how to cut a five-pointed star in a single snip. Impressed, the committee entrusted Betsy with making our first flag.   

 

REF:   http://www.ushistory.org/betsy/flagtale.html

ROSIE THE RIVETER
ROSIE THE RIVETER Photobucket

ROSIE THE RIVETER

 

Rosie the Riveter is a cultural icon of the United States, representing the American women who worked in factories during World War II, many of whom produced munitions and war supplies] These women sometimes took entirely new jobs replacing the male workers who were in the military. Rosie the Riveter is commonly used as a symbol of feminism and women's economic power.

The term "Rosie the Riveter" was first used in 1942 in a song of the same name written by Redd Evans and John Jacob Loeb. The song was recorded by numerous artists, including the popular big band leader Kay Kyser, and it became a national hit. The song portrays "Rosie" as a tireless assembly line worker, who is doing her part to help the American war effort.[5] The name is said to be a nickname for Rosie Bonavitas who was working for Convair in San Diego, California.] The idea of Rosie resembled Veronica Foster, a real person who in 1941 was Canada's poster girl for women in the war effort in "Ronnie, the Bren Gun Girl."

A man and woman riveting team working on the cockpit shell of a C-47 aircraft at the plant of North American Aviation (1942) and although women took on male dominated trades during World War II, they were expected to return to their everyday housework once men returned from the war. Government campaigns targeting women were addressed solely at housewives, perhaps because already employed women would move to the higher-paid "essential" jobs on their own, perhaps because it was assumed that most would be housewives. One government advertisement asked women "Can you use an electric mixer? If so, you can learn to operate a drill."  Propaganda was also directed at their husbands, many of whom were unwilling to support such jobs. Most women opted to do this. Later, many women returned to traditional work such as clerical or administration positions, despite their reluctance to re-enter the lower-paying fields. However, some of these women continued working in the factories.

 

REF:   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosie_the_Riveter