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Zeb and Deb anti-bullying K-2 lesson 5: Monkey Mick and Monkey Minn

Introduction: Zeb and Deb are a brother-and-sister spy team. They help characters solve problems. Rob and Tina have lost their joy due to bullying. Read how Zeb and Deb assist these two kids in becoming bully-free.

This slideshow contains illustrations of the PDF poster downloads included with lesson 5: Sympathy versus Empathy Song, picture of Monkey Mick and Monkey Minn, plus Jay’s Cheer Chant.
This slideshow contains illustrations of the PDF poster downloads included with lesson 5: Sympathy versus Empathy Song, picture of Monkey Mick and Monkey Minn, plus Jay’s Cheer Chant.
Debbie Dunn aka DJ Lyons
Monkey Mick and Monkey Minn lesson 5 article picture clip
Debbie Dunn aka DJ Lyons

Three (3) Essential Questions

Teacher asks three correlated essential questions that tie in with the appropriate K-2 Guidance Counseling and Health guidelines for the state of Tennessee. These questions would likely tie in the guidelines for other states; however, since the author is a Tennessee resident, she did not research their guidelines.

1A. Teacher says or asks: What do you think it means to feel sympathy for someone?

Students Respond: Accept reasonable answers such as:

* Sympathy means you feel sorry for someone. Sympathy could be defined, as stated in thefreedictionary.com, “A feeling or an expression of pity or sorrow for the distress of another; compassion.”

1B. Teacher says or asks: Please share an example of a time you felt sympathy for someone.

Students Respond: Accept reasonable answers.

2A. Teacher says or asks: What do you think it means to feel empathy for someone?

Students Respond: Accept reasonable answers such as:

* Empathy means you are trying to see things from the other person’s point of view. Empathy could be defined, as stated in thefreedictionary.com, “The power of entering into another’s personality and imaginatively experiencing his feelings.”

2B. Teacher says or asks: Here is an example of empathy. By a show of hands, how many of you have ever seen someone cry on TV or in a movie or in real life, and it made you feel like crying?

Students Respond: (Allow students to observe how many fellow classmates raised their hands.)

2C. Teacher says or asks: Here is another example of empathy. By a show of hands, how many of you have ever seen someone yawn and it made you feel like you had to yawn?

Students Respond: (Allow students to observe how many fellow classmates raised their hands.)

2D. Teacher says or asks: Here is another example of empathy. By a show of hands, how many of you have ever seen someone laughing really hard, and even though you had no clue what was so funny, it made you feel like you had to laugh as well?

Students Respond: (Allow students to observe how many fellow classmates raised their hands.)

2E. Teacher says or asks: Here is a final example of empathy. By a show of hands, how many of you have ever heard of somebody getting bullied, and it made you feel sad or scared as it made you think of a time you were bullied as well?

Students Respond: (Allow students to observe how many fellow classmates raised their hands.)

3A. Teacher says or asks: Listen to this quote: “You can’t really know a man until you have walked a mile in his shoes.” What do you think that quote means?

[Quote source: A variation of this quote probably originated from the Cherokee Indians.]

Students Respond: Accept reasonable answers such as:

The only way you can really understand another person is to try to, figuratively speaking, walk a mile in his shoes. In other words, you try to use your imagination to see as this person sees and feel how this person feels.

3B. Teacher says or asks: To help us understand those two words better, let’s learn to sing this three-verse song to the tune of “If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands.”

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Sympathy versus Empathy Song

© 2014 lyrics re-told by Debbie Dunn. Tune author unknown.

(Sing this song to the tune of “If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands”. Author unknown.)

Teacher says or asks: Does anybody know the song called “If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands”?

Students Respond: Observe students’ response. Have the class sing the first verse of this original song so they can get the tune and rhythm of the song firmly in their heads.

“If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands.

CLAP-CLAP.

If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands.

CLAP-CLAP.

If you’re happy and you know it,

and you really want to show it.

(OR Then your face will surely show it.)

If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands.

CLAP-CLAP-CLAP.”

Teacher says or asks: We are going to use the same tune but sing different words for this three-verse song called “Sympathy versus Empathy Song.”

Sympathy versus Empathy Song

© 2014 lyrics re-told by Debbie Dunn. Tune author unknown.

  1. Click large-print poster link: Lyrics on a three-page poster - Sympathy versus Empathy song
  2. Click print-out student copy link: Lyrics on one page - Sympathy versus Empathy song
  3. YouTube video: Sympathy versus Empathy song, Lyrics by Debbie Dunn Grades K-5

If you feel sorry for someone,

it shows you care.

CLAP-CLAP

If you feel sorry for someone,

it shows you care.

CLAP-CLAP

When you feel sorry for someone,

this is called Sym-path-y.

If you feel sorry for someone,

it shows you care.

CLAP-CLAP-CLAP

* * * * *

If a friend or loved one feels sad and blue,

CLAP-CLAP

If a friend or loved one feels sad and blue,

CLAP-CLAP

If this makes you feel sad

and blue for them and you,

that means you are feeling Empathy

CLAP-CLAP-CLAP

* * * * *

When you try to walk a mile in their shoes,

CLAP-CLAP

When you try to walk a mile in their shoes,

CLAP-CLAP

It’s called Empathy

when you try to understand

what they are facing in their life.

CLAP-CLAP-CLAP

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Previous lessons

This is the Zeb and Deb anti-bullying K-2 lesson 4. For lessons 1-4, click the links below:

Lesson 1: Introducing program, song, and class rules

Lesson 2: Rob and Tina lost their joy

Lesson 3: Rob, Tina, and the Mouse Mother tale

Lesson 4: More about tiny Tina and big Rob

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Teacher says or asks: Once again, we are going to hear a story about the Zeb and Deb brother-and-sister spy team. They help characters solve problems. Rob and Tina have lost their joy due to bullying. In Zeb’s and Deb’s quest to assist these two kids in becoming bully-free, they introduce them to two monkeys.

This next story is called “Monkey Mick and Monkey Minn.”

Suggested activity #1: Post a picture of Zeb and Deb.

* Zeb and Deb poster and sing-along song or chant PDF download

Suggested activity #2: Post a picture of Rob and Tina.

* Rob and Tina poster PDF download

Suggested activity #3: Post a picture of Monkey Mick and Monkey Minn.

* Monkey Mick and Monkey Minn poster PFD download

Suggested activity #4: Class participates in sing-along song called “Spies like Zeb and Deb.” See the video that accompanies this article. If desired, the class could alternatively chant the words rather than sing to the designated tune.

* Zeb and Deb poster and sing-along song or chant PDF download

* YouTube video: Spies like Zeb and Deb sing along video for grades K 2

* Examiner article: Anti-bullying K-2 sing along song called ‘Spies like Zeb and Deb’

Lyrics:

Spies like Zeb and Deb

are very, very wise.

Lost or stolen?

Problems big or small?

They can help you solve it all.

Monkey Mick and Monkey Minn

© 2014 by Debbie Dunn

Deb said, “I think you two need to meet the twins: Mick and Minn.” She then pushed a button on her desk.

Zeb said, “Mick and Minn lost their joy for a time, but they found some helpful ways to get back their joyful feelings.”

When the door opened, Rob and Tina were quite surprised to see a boy monkey wearing a blue jumpsuit and his look-alike sister wearing a pink jumpsuit.

Deb said, “Mick and Minn, please say ‘Howdy’ and shake hands with Rob and Tina.”

Mick and Minn said, “Howdy, Rob and Tina.” Then two monkey paws shook two human hands.

Rob said, “Wow! You can talk.”

Mick smiled and said, “Surprise!”

Tina asked, “Is Mick short for Mickey and Minn short for Minnie?”

The twins nodded sadly.

Minn sighed and said, “Sigh! Sadly, yes. Our parents thought it would be cute to name us that.”

Mick said, “It wasn't so cute when the kids made fun of us.”

Minn said, “They would taunt us by calling us ‘Mickey Mouse’ and ‘Minnie Mouse’.”

Mick said, “We would get mad. We would tell them that we weren't mice; we were monkeys.”

Minn said, “If there was a grown-up nearby, the kids would try to claim they were just teasing.”

Mick said, “That wasn't true at all. Teasing is something that friends do in gentle fun.”

Minn said, “What they did was actually taunting as they were the only ones having fun. Mick and I felt sad, disappointed, and mad.”

Rob said, “That’s kind of like us. The kids make fun of us for our size, our glasses, and our looks.”

Tina said, “If a teacher overheard, the kids would claim they were just teasing. I knew that wasn't true. Minn, what was that word you said it really was?”

Minn said, “Taunts or taunting. When someone calls you names just so they can make you feel bad, they are taunting you instead of joking around or teasing.”

Rob said, “Sometimes, the teacher would make the kids say they were sorry, but the way they said those words sounded fake instead of real.”

Tina said, “The teacher would expect us to feel all better due to getting a fake apology. I never did.”

Rob said, “Me, neither.”

Mick and Minn both nodded their agreement and said, “It never made us feel better, either.”

Zeb said, “Mick and Minn, please explain some of the ways you found to start feeling joyful again.”

Minn said, “Phew, Zeb! I’m glad you said that. I was starting to drift back to that sad place.”

Mick shook off his sadness as well. He said, “Me, too. Quick! Let’s teach Rob and Tina Jay’s cheer chant. That helps me remember that I am worthwhile and special.”

Minn said, “Good idea, Mick! That always helps me to feel more cheerful!”

Tina asked, “How does it go?”

Deb pushed a button. She said, “Since our friend, Jay, the Blue Jay is the author of this cheer chant, let’s invite him over to do the teaching.”

Suddenly, there was a peck, peck, peck on the office door. Zeb opened the door and said, “Welcome, Jay. Please meet Rob and Tina.”

Jay, the Blue Jay, flew in the door and landed on top of Zeb's desk. He looked over at Rob and Tina and said, “Hi, Rob and Tina, you can call me Jay.”

Rob said, “Wow! You can talk, too! Cool!”

Mick smiled and said, “Stick around, Kid, and you’ll see that there is a whole bunch of us animals who can talk like a human.”

This time, both Rob and Tina said, “Cool!”

Deb said, “Jay, Rob and Tina are dealing with bullying at their school. They are feeling sad and need a great way to SELF-MENTOR. Would you please teach them your cheer chant?

Jay said, “I would be happy, too. It helped Mick and Minn. Hopefully, it will help you as well.”

Minn said, “Jay got this idea from a cheerleader camp. When he was growing up, his nest was located in a nearby tree.”

Tina turned to Jay and said, “Jay, how does this cheer go?”

Jay said, “Mick and Minn, say it with me. Then, Rob and Tina, as soon as you catch on to the words, say them with me as well.”

Jay, the Blue Jay’s cheer chant

Cheer re-told by Debbie Dunn

Mick, Minn, Zeb, Deb, and Jay starting chanting the following cheer. They even danced a bit as they chanted.

Jay! Jay!

All right! Okay!

I’m all right!

I’m okay!

No matter what

their mean words say!

Yeah!

As soon as they got a handle on the words, Rob and Tina joined them.

Class, let’s all of us chant these words together. If you like, stand up, and we’ll chant and dance to these fun SELF-MENTORING words.

Jay! Jay!

All right! Okay!

I’m all right!

I’m okay!

No matter what

their mean words say!

Yeah!

Tina laughed and said, “That cheer does help me feel a bit better. I might even try to think those words to myself when any kid at school tries to put me down.”

Minn said, “That’s what I did, too. It helped distract me.”

Rob said, “What do you mean?”

Minn said, “By saying this cheer inside my head, I sometimes was able to tune out the mean words somebody else was saying. As a result, I was able to hold onto my good feelings a lot better.”

Rob said, “That makes sense. I may try that, too.”

Tina said, “Me, too.”

Zeb said, “This is just one of the many things that Mick and Minn did to feel better. Since it is getting late, let’s all meet here after school tomorrow.”

Rob said, “Okay.”

Tina said, “I’ll see you all tomorrow. Thanks, Jay. Thanks, Mick and Minn. Thanks, Zeb and Deb. This really helps me feel hopeful that things are going to get better.”

Rob said, “Me, too. Thanks! I’ll see you tomorrow.”

Zeb, Deb, Mick, and Minn all waved good-bye. Jay flapped his wing up and down like he was waving as well.

As Rob and Tina headed home to tell their parents what they had learned, they had fun chanting Jay’s cheer chant again and again.

Let’s all repeat that cheer one more time together:

Jay! Jay!

All right! Okay!

I’m all right!

I’m okay!

No matter what

their mean words say!

Yeah!

=======FREEZE FRAME=======

Teacher says or asks: When you heard about Mick and Minn being taunted by some of the other monkeys, did any of you feel sorry for them?

Students respond: Accept reasonable answers.

Teacher says or asks: What is it called when you feel sorry for somebody.

Students respond: It’s called feeling Sympathy.

Teacher says or asks: When you heard that other monkeys were making fun of Mick’s and Minn’s names, what else did you feel? In other words, did it make you feel mad or sad, like it reminded you of a time when someone make fun of your name?

Students respond: Accept reasonable answers.

Teacher says or asks: What is it called when hearing about somebody else feeling sad and blue makes you not only feel a little sad and blue for them, but you also feel a little sad and blue for you?

Students respond: It’s called feeling Empathy.

Teacher says or asks: Feeling empathy is a really good thing to do. If you felt empathy for either Mick and Minn or for Rob and Tina, give yourself a pat on the back. Good job!

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For the follow-up activities for this lesson, click the link below:

  • Part B. Tattling versus telling skits set 2: Name-calling plus using I Messages (coming soon)

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Suggested guidance and health follow-up activities

As time allows, have class participate in any of the following related activities:

As suggested in the School Counseling guidelines created by the Tennessee Department of Education for grades K-2, read and discuss these two recommended books:

1. “The Meanest Thing” by Bill Cosby

2. “Let’s Talk about Teasing” by Joy Berry

As suggested in the Health guidelines (Emotional, Social, and Mental Health) created by the Tennessee Department of Education for grades K-2:

1. (Paraphrased) Play a game matching emotions to facial expressions.

2. (Paraphrased) Create and discuss “a role play situation where bullying is involved.”

3. (Paraphrased) Students draw pictures “illustrating how individuals may look as they experience different feelings.” Perhaps they could make a class book. Or perhaps the teacher could take pictures of the students intentionally looking glad, sad, scared, mad, etc. Label each picture with the matching emotion.

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Benchmarks and Standards from the Department of Education for the State of Tennessee

Please note: This anti-bullying lesson ties in with the following grades K-2 guidance counseling and health benchmarks and standards for the state of Tennessee. It could also apply to the guidance counseling and health benchmarks and standards for other states as well; however, since the author is a Tennessee resident, she has only researched Tennessee guidelines.

Please also note: Only key words and phrases will be listed for the standards. For the full text, please see the full-text resource section below for the downloadable PDF guidelines.

SCHOOL COUNSELING & CAREER GUIDANCE: GRADES K-2 (adopted in 2005)

School Counseling Standard 3: “Relate School to Life Experiences”

  • Helpers in school & community:

* Standard 3: Level 1

* Standard 3: Level 3

School Counseling Standard 6: “Knowledge and skills to achieve Career goals”

  • “Conflict management skills with peers and adults:”

* 6.3

* Standard 6: Level 2

* Standard 6: Level 3

* Standard 6: Sample Task: Stoplight Exercise

School Counseling Standard 7: “Self Knowledge and Interpersonal Skills”

  • Feelings:

* 7.2

* Standard 7: Level 1

* Standard 7: Level 2

  • “Demonstrate a positive attitude toward self:”

* 7.1

* Standard 7: Level 2

  • Communication skills:

* 7.4

School Counseling Standard 9 “Acquire Personal Safety Skills”

  • Coping skills:

9.1

  • Helpers in school & community:

* 9.2

* Standard 9: Level 1

  • Bullying & Teasing:

* Standard 9: Level 3

* Standard 9: Sample Task

  • “Effective and appropriate ways to respond to ‘put-downs, compliments, and kind responses’.”

* Standard 9: Sample Task

  • “Alternative approaches to resolving conflict non-violently”

* Standard 9: Sample Task

  • Emotion:

* Standard 9: Level 3

TENNESSEE HEALTH EDUCATION STANDARDS PRE-K – 2

Section called: Emotional, Social, and Mental Health”.

Standard 8: The student will understand the importance of positive self-concept and interpersonal relationships for healthy living.”

  • Feelings & Expression:

* 8.1

* Standard 8: Level 1 (three listings)

* Standard 8: Level 2

* 2 Teacher Assessment Indicators example

  • Manage emotions & Feeling sad/sadness:

* Standard 8: Level 2 (two listings)

  • Characteristics of a bully:

* Standard 8: Level 1

  • “Actions to take when confronted by a bully”:

* Standard 8: Level 2

  • “Role play of a bullying situation”:

* Standard 8: Level 3

* Teacher Assessment Indicators example

  • Communication skills

* Standard 8: Level 1

* Standard 8: Level 2

Full-Text Resources:

School Counseling & Career Guidance: Grades K-2 for the state of Tennessee (Adopted in 2005)

Tennessee Health Education Standards pre-K-2

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Lesson 6: Tina, Rob, and Ellen Eagle’s Traffic Light Game (coming soon)

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See Debbie Dunn’s articles on | School Conflict Resolution | K-8 Classroom Activities | Women’s Health | Storytelling Website

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For comments or questions, e-mail: moredunntales@yahoo.com

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