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Zeb and Deb anti-bullying K-2 lesson 4: More about tiny Tina and big Rob

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Introduction: Zeb and Deb are a brother-and-sister spy team. They help characters solve problems. Rob and Tina have lost their joy due to bullying. Read how Zeb and Deb assist these two kids in becoming bully-free.

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Three (3) Essential Questions

Teacher asks three correlated essential questions that tie in with the appropriate K-2 Guidance Counseling and Health guidelines for the state of Tennessee. These questions would likely tie in the guidelines for other states; however, since the author is a Tennessee resident, she did not research their guidelines.

1. Teacher says or asks: Look at the poster called ‘Fight, Flight, Freeze, or Self-Mentor’. If you were going to tell someone at home about this poster, how would you describe it?

Students Respond: Accept reasonable answers.

2. Teacher says or asks: I need a volunteer to play the role of Vanna White from the ‘Wheel of Fortune’ show. If you are a guy, you will be called Van. You will model the ‘Fight, Flight, Freeze, or Self-Mentor’ poster. As I relate a very short story, you will point to the part of the poster that highlights that part of the tale.

Students Respond: (Choose an eager volunteer.)

Teacher says or asks: Let’s pretend that you are living back in the time when there were dinosaurs and saber-toothed tigers. You are a cave man. As you are sitting on the ground, you see an enormous shadow of something heading in your direction. From the direction of the sun, you are not sure whether this is a big something or a small something. For a few moments, you FREEZE in fear. (Vanna or Van should point to the ‘FREEZE’ part of the poster.)

You get a funny kind of ticklish feeling in the tummy. It almost felt like butterflies were fluttering around inside his stomach. Have you ever felt that feeling when you are either excited or scared? That feeling is sometimes called an adrenaline rush. It is simply your body giving you the energy to do a good job. We are can that adrenaline rush feeling a form of SELF-MENTORING as your body is doing its best to help you. (Vanna or Van should point to the ‘SELF-MENTOR’ part of the poster.)

Using that adrenaline rush energy, you very carefully adjust yourself so that you are in a crouching position. That way, you can choose the FLIGHT option if need be by running away. (Vanna or Van should point to the ‘FLIGHT’ part of the poster.)

Raise your hand if you ever have run away in fear and found yourself running faster than you ever have run before.

Students Respond: (Give the students a chance to observe how many fellow classmates have their hands raised.)

Teacher says or asks: Raise your hand if you ever have been riding your bike and a big dog started running in your direction. Since you felt suspicious that it might wish you harm, you found yourself pedaling your bike faster than you ever have before.

Students Respond: (Give the students a chance to observe how many fellow classmates have their hands raised.)

Teacher says or asks: That is what that adrenaline rush feeling does. It gives your body the fuel or the energy to do a good job surviving the situation.

So, back to our story about the caveman. Using that adrenaline rush energy, you quietly and quickly grab your spear. That way, if necessary, you can choose the FIGHT option by trying to FIGHT off this creature. (Vanna or Van should point to the ‘FIGHT’ part of the poster.)

You are feeling pretty nervous. To calm yourself down a little, you SELF-MENTOR by taking a deep breath. Let’s everyone help the caveman by taking three deep breaths. (Vanna or Van should point to the ‘SELF-MENTOR’ part of the poster.)

Another way you SELF-MENTOR is by giving yourself a pep talk. Inside your head, you say to yourself, “I can do this! I’m a survivor. I am going to be fine.” Let’s everyone help the caveman by repeating those SELF-MENTORING words three times. (Vanna or Van should point to the ‘SELF-MENTOR’ part of the poster.)

Feeling calmer, you use that adrenaline rush energy to give you the courage to quickly stand up and then turn around to face this unknown creature. Suddenly you start laughing with relief. What creature do you guess was heading in his direction?

Students Respond: Allow students to guess.

Teacher says or asks: It turns out that it was just a squirrel that somehow managed to cast a big shadow.

If you were a cave man in real life and that shadow had turned out to be a saber-toothed tiger instead, which part of the FIGHT, FLIGHT, or FREEZE instinct would you have chosen to give into?

Students Respond: Accept reasonable answers such as choosing the FLIGHT option by trying to run away fast enough that the saber-toothed tiger couldn’t catch him. Or, he might choose the FIGHT option and hope that he managed to successfully overpower the saber-toothed tiger.

Make certain the students understand that they can count on that adrenaline rush energy feeling to help give them the energy or the fuel to do a better job surviving the situation.

Teacher says or asks: Let’s give our Van or Vanna a hand for doing a great job modeling the ‘Fight, Flight, Freeze, or Self-Mentor’ poster.

3. Teacher says or asks: I need a new volunteer to play Van or Vanna as I have one more short example.

Students Respond: (Choose an eager volunteer.)

3A. Teacher says or asks: Let’s imagine that the teacher has asked a question and you are practically positive you know the correct answer. The only problem is, you feel kind of shy to raise your hand. So you, FREEZE in fear or nervousness. (Vanna or Van should point to the ‘FREEZE’ part of the poster.)

You notice that nobody else is raising their hands as no one else seems to know the answer. You get that adrenaline rush feeling due to fear. For a few seconds, you decide to choose the FLIGHT option by being too scared to raise your hand. (Vanna or Van should point to the ‘FLIGHT’ part of the poster.)

To calm yourself down a little, you SELF-MENTOR by taking a deep breath. Let’s everyone help this pretend student by taking three deep breaths. (Vanna or Van should point to the ‘SELF-MENTOR’ part of the poster.)

Another way you SELF-MENTOR is by giving yourself a pep talk. Inside your head, you say to yourself, “I’m brave enough to do this. I can help the class by sharing what I know. I will be fine.” (Vanna or Van should point to the ‘SELF-MENTOR’ part of the poster.)

You could even imagine that if the singer named Sara Bareilles was around, she would look at you and sing, “I wanna see you be brave.

YouTube video: Sara Bareilles - Brave

Let’s all help that student SELF-MENTOR by singing that phrase to him or her. (Vanna or Van should point to the ‘SELF-MENTOR’ part of the poster.)

Students Respond: “I wanna see you be brave.”

Feeling calmer, you use that adrenaline rush energy to give you the courage to FIGHT that feeling of nervousness. That adrenaline rush energy suddenly courses through your body. You FIGHT your nerves by making yourself raise your hand. (Vanna or Van should point to the ‘FIGHT’ part of the poster.)

The teacher calls on you. Still feeling a tad nervous, you SELF-MENTOR by taking another deep breath. (Vanna or Van should point to the ‘SELF-MENTOR’ part of the poster.)

Taking that deep breath really seemed to help. Feeling calmer, you share the answer with the teacher and the class. The teacher smiles in approval. The students looked relieved that you answered the question that they felt unsure about. You feel relieved and kind of proud of yourself.

3B. Teacher says or asks: Look at that poster once again that Van (or Vanna) is modeling. How would you describe what that poster means now?

Students Respond: Accept reasonable answers.

Teacher says or asks: Let’s give our Van or Vanna a hand for doing a great job modeling the ‘Fight, Flight, Freeze, or Self-Mentor’ poster.

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Previous Zeb and Deb anti-bullying lessons

This is the Zeb and Deb anti-bullying K-2 lesson 4. For lessons 1-3, click the links below:

Lesson 1: Introducing program, song, and class rules

Lesson 2: Rob and Tina lost their joy

Lesson 3: Rob, Tina, and the Mouse Mother tale

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Story time

Teacher says or asks: Zeb and Deb are a brother-and-sister spy team. They help characters solve problems. Rob and Tina have lost their joy due to bullying. Read how Zeb and Deb assist these two kids in becoming bully-free.

This next story is called “More about tiny Tina and big Rob.”

Suggested activity #1: Post a picture of Zeb and Deb.

* Zeb and Deb poster and sing-along song or chant PDF download

Suggested activity #2: Post a picture of Rob and Tina.

* Rob and Tina poster PDF download

Suggested activity #3: Class participates in sing-along song called “Spies like Zeb and Deb.” See the video that accompanies this article. If desired, the class could alternatively chant the words rather than sing to the designated tune.

* Zeb and Deb poster and sing-along song or chant PDF download

* YouTube video: Spies like Zeb and Deb sing along video for grades K 2

* Examiner article: Anti-bullying K-2 sing along song called ‘Spies like Zeb and Deb’

Lyrics:

Spies like Zeb and Deb

are very, very wise.

Lost or stolen?

Problems big or small?

They can help you solve it all.

More about tiny Tina and big Rob

© 2014 by Debbie Dunn

Introduction: You are about to hear another story about Rob and Tina. Listen for the emotions that the various characters are feeling throughout the story. Also, notice examples when any of the characters in the story either are choosing the FIGHT option, the FLIGHT option, the FREEZE option, or the SELF-MENTOR option.

At the end of the story, we will have a brief discussion about that. Then, we will act out some skits the will help you figure out the difference between tattling or snitching versus telling or reporting.

Look at the picture of Rob and Tina. What do you notice about them?

Students Respond: (Allow students to guess.)

Yes, Tina is a lot smaller than Rob even though she is almost a year older than him.

Anybody want to guess why that might be?

Students Respond: (Allow students to guess.)

If you ask Tina in a nice way, she will tell you the story of why she is so small. That’s what Zeb and Deb did. Here is what they learned.

Tina said, “My Mom slipped and fell on the icy driveway when she was pregnant with me. This caused her to go into labor two months early.”

Rob said, “We live next door to them. My Mom said she looked out the window and saw Mrs. Thomas lying on the driveway. My Mom was pregnant with me at the time and didn’t dare go out. She was so scared. But she was smart, too. She was the one who called 9-1-1 so that the ambulance could come to take Tina’s Mom to the hospital.”

Tina said, “Yeah, Rob. Your mom is smart and nice, too. I really like her. Well, back to what happened. Mom says that most babies are born weighing five to ten pounds. I only weighed two and a half pounds.”

Rob said, “My Mom said you were only a little taller than a twelve-inch ruler. She also said you had to spend two months in a heated glass thing to finish growing.”

Deb asked, “Do you mean an incubator?”

Tina said, “That’s right. My parents were not even allowed to hold me until I was six days old. All they could do was stick their hands through the armholes in the sides of the incubator to hold my hand or stroke my head.”

Zeb said, “I bet they felt so excited when they could finally pick you up.”

Tina said, “Yup! But they were scared, too. The doctors didn’t know if I was going to live or die until I finally started gaining weight.”

Deb said, “That does sound scary.”

Tina said, “My big brother Toby said that he was the first to figure out that I was going to live.”

Rob asked, “I forgot. How did Toby do that?”

Tina said, “When I was four weeks old, he stuck his hand through the armhole in the incubator. He said that I grabbed hold of his finger with my whole hand and wouldn’t let go. Then, my bigger brother, Tommy, wanted to try. I grabbed hold of his finger, too. Tommy said that it showed I was getting stronger. My family felt so relieved.”

Deb asked, “When did they get to bring you home?”

Tina said, “When I was two months old. My Dad told me that they were so happy to have me home that they have treated me like a princess ever since.”

Deb said, “That sounds good.”

Tina said, “It was good. It still is – at home. It’s just at school that I feel like Cinderella – the girl that no one thinks is worth much of anything.”

Zeb said, “Tina, we are going to help you fix that.”

Tina said, “I hope so! It’s no fun to feel sad.”

Deb asked, “Rob, could you please share your story?”

Rob said, “Tina was born in March. I was supposed to be born in December. The only problem was, those weather guys on TV said we were going to have a bad snowstorm. My parents were afraid they wouldn’t be able to get to the hospital in time when I was ready to be born.”

Tina said, “I forgot. I know you were born in January instead of December. How did that happen?”

Rob said, “My Mom’s doctor gave her some special medicine to keep her from having me during the snowstorm.”

Tina said, “Oh, okay.”

Rob said, “My dad said the medicine worked too well. It caused me to be born three weeks late. So, when I was born, I weighed almost twelve pounds. My big sister, Ruby, said that I was a biiiiiiiggggg baby. That’s how she always says it. But she also said I looked real cute. She was five years old at the time. She gave away a bunch of her dolls and played with me instead.”

Deb said, “I did the same thing. My little brother was born when I was eight years old. I was so proud that I got to push a real baby in a real baby carriage while all my friends only had dolls to push in their doll baby carriages.”

Rob giggled. “That’s what happened to Ruby, too.”

Then Rob got serious. “When I was born, the doctors said I was mostly healthy. But I had one problem.”

Zeb said, “What was that?”

Rob said, “He said I had a thy___, uh, …, I always have trouble with that word.”

Zeb said, “Are you trying to say thyroid problem?”

Rob said, “That’s the word. Yeah, because I have a thyroid problem, the doctors said I would be bigger than most kids my age.”

Tina said, “Yeah. My mom said that it didn’t matter if you eat a lot or a little, you’re just a big boy. But I don’t care if you’re a big boy or a little boy, Rob. You’re my friend, and I like spending time with you.”

Rob smiled. “Yeah, Tina and I have lots of fun together.”

Then Rob looked sad. “I was scared to start school because I had heard how mean some of the kids were to Tina. She was the smallest girl in kindergarten, first grade, and now second grade. As for me, I was the biggest kid in kindergarten and now first grade. I’m even bigger than some of the second graders.”

Deb asked, “So, do kids made fun of you for being big?”

Rob nodded. “Yeah. They make fun of me for being big. They make fun of both of us for having to wear glasses.”

Tina said, “And they also make fun of me because even though my Mom thinks I’m pretty, the kids at school don’t like the way I look. That makes me feel bad.”

Rob said, “The kids at school don’t like the way I look, either. That’s part of why we came to see you. We don’t like the way we are being treated.”

Tina said, “Yeah. We want the kids to treat us nice instead of mean. Can you help us?”

Zeb said, “I think we can.”

Deb said, “Yes, we would definitely like to help you recover your feelings of joy.”

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Class discussion about examples of ‘Fight, Flight, Freeze, or Self-Mentoring’.

1. Teacher says or asks: I need a new volunteer to play Van or Vanna to model our ‘Fight, Flight, Freeze, or Self-Mentor’ poster as we briefly discuss this story.

Students Respond: (Choose an eager volunteer.)

2. Teacher says or asks: Van (or Vanna), please point to the FREEZE part of the poster.

Class, when do you think any of the characters in the story might have briefly FROZEN in fright or from a case or nerves or feelings of stress?

Students Respond: Accept reasonable answers such as:

* When Tina’s mother slipped and fell on the ice while seven-months pregnant, she probably FROZE in fear or pain while she waited for the ambulance to arrive.

* Rob’s mother probably FROZE in shock for a moment when she saw her neighbor lying on the ground.

3. Teacher says or asks: Van (or Vanna), please point to the FIGHT part of the poster.

Class, when do you think any of the characters in the story might have chosen some form of the FIGHT option?

Students Respond: Accept reasonable answers such as:

* Rob’s mother managed to FIGHT her fear and nerves to manage to call 9-1-1.

* Tina’s family were choosing the FIGHT option by visiting Tina in the hospital as she was lying in the incubator. They probably encouraged Tina to FIGHT to live.

* Stroking Tina’s hands and head while she was lying in the incubator was a form of FIGHTING as they were trying to comfort the tiny baby and to help her to feel loved.

* Tina used the FIGHT option by holding on to her big brother’s finger with all her strength.

* Zeb and Deb are going to choose the FIGHT option as they plan to FIGHT to help Tina and Rob become bully-free.

* Tina is using the FIGHT option by telling Rob that whether he is big or small, she is still his friend.

* Rob FIGHTS to let Tina know that he likes having fun with her.

* Rob and Tina are both displaying the FIGHT option by continuing to go to school even though they are being bullied by some of their classmates.

4. Teacher says or asks: Van (or Vanna), please point to the FLIGHT part of the poster.

Class, when do you think any of the characters in the story might have chosen some form of the FLIGHT option?

Students Respond: Accept reasonable answers such as:

* The family might have given in to the FLIGHT option at times by crying and getting depressed since they were afraid that Tina might die.

* Tina is kind of giving in to the FLIGHT option as she feels like she is Cinderella at school. She thinks this means that no one thinks she is worth much of anything.

* Rob felt scared to go to school as he was afraid that what had happened to Tina would happen to him. He almost gave in to the FLIGHT option.

5. Teacher says or asks: Van (or Vanna), please point to the SELF-MENTOR part of the poster.

Class, when do you think any of the characters in the story might have chosen some form of SELF-MENTORING?

Students Respond: Accept reasonable answers such as:

* Toby kind of SELF-MENTORED as he decided that Tina must be getting strong enough to live since she showed some strength as she gripped his finger with her tiny hand.

* Rob’s parents SELF-MENTORED by getting the doctor to give the mother medicine to keep her from going into labor during the snowstorm.

* Rob is kind of SELF-MENTORING as he is recalling that Ruby, his big sister, finds him cute and fun to play with.

6. Teacher says or asks: How else would you suggest that Rob and Tina could SELF-MENTOR themselves?

Students Respond: Accept reasonable answers.

Teacher says or asks: Let’s give our Van or Vanna a hand for doing a great job modeling the ‘Fight, Flight, Freeze, or Self-Mentor’ poster.

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For the follow-up activities for this lesson, click the link below:

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Suggested guidance and health follow-up activities

As time allows, have class participate in any of the following related activities:

As suggested in the School Counseling guidelines created by the Tennessee Department of Education for grades K-2, read and discuss these two recommended books:

1. “The Meanest Thing” by Bill Cosby

2. “Let’s Talk about Teasing” by Joy Berry

As suggested in the Health guidelines (Emotional, Social, and Mental Health) created by the Tennessee Department of Education for grades K-2:

1. (Paraphrased) Play a game matching emotions to facial expressions.

  1. Play four (4) games with printable facial expression cards
  2. Facial expressions slideshow showing all 30 sets of facial expressions cards

2. (Paraphrased) Create and discuss “a role play situation where bullying is involved.”

3. (Paraphrased) Students draw pictures “illustrating how individuals may look as they experience different feelings.” Perhaps they could make a class book. Or perhaps the teacher could take pictures of the students intentionally looking glad, sad, scared, mad, etc. Label each picture with the matching emotion.

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Benchmarks and Standards from the Department of Education for the State of Tennessee

Please note: This anti-bullying lesson ties in with the following grades K-2 guidance counseling and health benchmarks and standards for the state of Tennessee. It could also apply to the guidance counseling and health benchmarks and standards for other states as well; however, since the author is a Tennessee resident, she has only researched Tennessee guidelines.

Please also note: Only key words and phrases will be listed for the standards. For the full text, please see the full-text resource section below for the downloadable PDF guidelines.

SCHOOL COUNSELING & CAREER GUIDANCE: GRADES K-2 (adopted in 2005)

School Counseling Standard 3: “Relate School to Life Experiences”

  • Helpers in school & community:

* Standard 3: Level 1

* Standard 3: Level 3

School Counseling Standard 7: “Self Knowledge and Interpersonal Skills”

  • Feelings:

* 7.2

* Standard 7: Level 1

* Standard 7: Level 2

School Counseling Standard 9 “Acquire Personal Safety Skills”

  • Helpers in school & community:

* 9.2

* Standard 9: Level 1

  • Bullying & Teasing:

* Standard 9: Level 3

* Standard 9: Sample Task

  • “Effective and appropriate ways to respond to ‘put-downs, compliments, and kind responses’.”

* Standard 9: Sample Task

  • “Alternative approaches to resolving conflict non-violently”

* Standard 9: Sample Task

  • Emotion:

* Standard 9: Level 3

TENNESSEE HEALTH EDUCATION STANDARDS PRE-K – 2

Section called: Emotional, Social, and Mental Health”.

Standard 8: The student will understand the importance of positive self-concept and interpersonal relationships for healthy living.”

  • Feelings & Expression:

* 8.1

* Standard 8: Level 1 (three listings)

* Standard 8: Level 2

* 2 Teacher Assessment Indicators example

  • Manage emotions & Feeling sad/sadness:

* Standard 8: Level 2 (two listings)

  • Characteristics of a bully:

* Standard 8: Level 1

  • “Actions to take when confronted by a bully”:

* Standard 8: Level 2

  • “Role play of a bullying situation”:

* Standard 8: Level 3

* Teacher Assessment Indicators example

Full-Text Resources:

School Counseling & Career Guidance: Grades K-2 for the state of Tennessee (Adopted in 2005)

Tennessee Health Education Standards pre-K-2

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Future Zeb and Deb anti-bullying lessons.

Lesson 5: Monkey Mick and Monkey Minn

  • Part A. Zeb and Deb anti-bullying K-2 lesson 5: Monkey Mick and Monkey Minn
  • Part B. Tattling versus telling skits set 1: Name-calling plus using I Messages (coming soon)

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See Debbie Dunn’s articles on | School Conflict Resolution | K-8 Classroom Activities | Women’s Health | Storytelling Website

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For comments or questions, e-mail: moredunntales@yahoo.com

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