Skip to main content
  1. AXS Entertainment
  2. Arts & Entertainment
  3. Arts & Exhibits

You can color your photos with incorrect lighting

See also

If you incorrectly set your digital cameras’, light source settings, your photos will probably have colors that you do not want. On the other hand, perhaps you intentionally incorrectly set the light source settings for special effects. For either reason, if you do not attune your cameras to the correct lights, your images will have color casts.

More Photos

Digital, single-lens reflex cameras (DSLRs) allow photographers to select the light source/White Balance: daylight, tungsten light and white fluorescent light are three, main settings. (Although some photographers may use incandescent bulbs for lighting, DSLRs do not have settings for these light types. In many, and perhaps all states in the United States, it may be impossible to purchase incandescent bulbs; CFL [compact fluorescent] bulbs have replaced them. However, many Chicago households still have stocks of incandescent bulbs.)

For all photos, the subject was a lens filter (UV, screw-in type) on a Kodak Gray Card. This gray card reflects 18% of the light that falls upon it. The light sources were daylight, incandescent, tungsten and white fluorescent. All lighting was direct without shading from clouds, lamp shades or photographic umbrellas. The lens’ focal length was 70 mm. The aperture was f-11.

After setting White Balance to daylight, the first photo shows the filter under incandescent lighting. The second photo shows the filter under fluorescent lighting. The third photo shows the filter under tungsten lighting.

After setting the White Balance to tungsten (650 watts), the fourth photo shows the filter in daylight. The fifth photo shows the filter under incandescent lighting. The sixth photo shows the filter under fluorescent lighting.

After setting the White Balance to white fluorescent light (13 watts), the seventh photo shows the filter in daylight. The eighth photo shows the filter under incandescent lighting. The ninth photo shows the filter under tungsten lighting.

This DSLR camera does not have a White Balance, incandescent setting. For photos that have incandescent lighting, the bulb (100 watts) was frosted. (Frosted mean that the bulb had a translucent coating, not sweet, cake frosting.)

I did not adjust any of the photos with brightness/contrast filters, color saturation filters or color correction filters. All photos are jpegs. All photos are in RGB mode.

Advertisement