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Wine and cholesterol reduction: The new connection

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Have you heard about the natural ingredient Resveratrol? It is pronounced as “rezˈver ə träl” and is found naturally in the skin of grapes and in red wine. Several studies show that Resveratrol acts as a powerful antioxidant that help protects the body’s cells from serious health concerns, including cardiovascular issues. Studies also show Resveratrol helps promote healthy aging.

For the last decade, Resveratrol’s health benefits have been touted by everyone from Mayo Clinic physicians to Dr. Oz. But don’t worry if you don’t enjoy fruit or a glass of red wine. Resveratrol is also widely available in supplement form.

And now there is even more evidence of Resveratrol’s impressive health benefits. A small-scale double-blinded study found that supplements containing Resveratrol may reduce the production of compounds responsible for the build-up of cholesterol in the body of overweight and obese people.

In this quite high dose, human clinical trial, Resveratrol was shown to reduce the body’s production of low density lipoproteins (LDL) in the test subjects. This is important because LDLs are fat particles which are strongly associated with the development of cardiovascular issues.

Take Action!
This new information is not an excuse to start drinking large amounts of red wine, nor is it a reason to stay overweight. It is simply new science-based information that allows us to better understand how we can help manage our health naturally.

When looking for a supplement, read the label carefully. Choose a supplement with Resveratrol/red wine extract that contains a polyphenols. Don’t settle for anything less! The extract contains specific levels of polyphenols which are the active component in Resveratrol extract that provides the many health benefits.

Source: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology. Published online ahead of print, doi: “High-Dose Resveratrol Treatment for 2 Weeks Inhibits Intestinal and Hepatic Lipoprotein Production in Overweight/Obese Men “Authors: S. Dash, C. Xiao, C. Morgantini, L. Szeto, G.F. Lewis

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