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Willa Burrell of 'True Blood', all grown up

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[SPOILERS] Willa Burrell (Amelia Rose Blaire) is the most intriguing new character on “True Blood” from seasons six and seven. She grew from being a docile daddy’s girl into coming of age as an independent vampire woman. Her paradigm shift was subtle. Unfortunately, “True Blood” is closing the curtains before her character can be fully developed.

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In season seven, episode four “Lost Cause,” a different side of Willa emerges. Fans are left wondering about Willa's new life in Bon Temps, if “True Blood” wasn’t ending. She appeared to be a force to be reckoned with. Her older vampire sister, Pam Swynford De Beaufort (Kristin Bauer van Straten), didn’t intimidate her. Willa did not hesitate to tell Pam how she was to blame for the death of her best friend, Tara Thorton (Rutina Wesley). Tara was Pam’s prodigy.

Rightfully angry at being abandoned, Willa demanded her "missing in action" maker Eric Northman (Alexander Skarsgard) release her. After some smart negotiation on Willa’s part, Eric obliged for information about the whereabouts of her almost stepmother Sarah Newlin (Anna Camp). Willa kept her word, which is a credit to her integrity.

It would have been nice to see Willa interacting more with the townspeople of Bon Temps. There’s only a glimpse of how she would have begun her new life if the drama of the H-virus wasn’t rampant. The first thing Willa did after arriving at Sookie’s party was ask Arlene Fowler (Carrie Preston) for a waitress job. Independent adults support themselves. Yes, Willa is now her own vampire woman and ready for the world. The downside is her world of “True Blood” is coming to an untimely end.

Poor Willa Burrell, all grown up, but with no place to go.

About the Author:
C. C. J. Vann is a writer, columnist and speculative fiction enthusiast. Her blog is “C. C. J. Vann”, (www.ccjvann.com). You may contact her at info[at]ccjvann[dot]com.

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