Skip to main content

See also:

Why you should be saving seeds

Why You Should Be Saving Seeds
Why You Should Be Saving Seeds
Photo by David McNew/Getty Images

If you are a gardener, then you know the value of a seed. When you grow a great crop of anything, the natural desire is to preserve it and grow it again. Saving seeds is the best way to ensure that you perpetuate the flowers, fruits and vegetables you love most. If need more reasons, check out some of the reasons suggested by Mother Earth News.

Saving money is a big reason for many people. By saving seeds, you won’t have to spend money next spring to buy more seeds. If you continue the process, this year’s purchase may be the last time you ever spend money on seeds.

Being assured of the ability to grow a favorite variety is another good reason to save seeds. Many seed companies consolidate their stocks and focus on profitable hybrids. If you find a favorite in their catalogs this year, it may not be there next year.

What works well for you in your region is worth preserving. Not all seeds grow well in every region. If you find something that does well where you live, you may want to save the seeds to you can grow it again.

Heirloom quality is another excellent reason for saving seeds. Hybrid varieties remind some gardeners of the gardens their parents and grandparents grew. Heirloom varieties can also be more nutritious than hybrids which may have been genetically altered to produce a bigger bounty or have a longer shelf life.

Enhancing your crop is another reason to save seeds. When you inspect a crop, save seeds from those plants which have done exceptionally well or show the character traits you prefer. Things to look for include flavor, shape of the fruit, color of the flowers and time to germinate. Saving these seeds ensures you perpetuate only the best features of the variety.

If you haven’t been saving seeds, now is the time to get started. As you start harvesting the last crops of summer, leave some plants to go to seed. You’ll be grateful next spring!