Skip to main content

See also:

Why Marvel needs to fire Rick Remender

Jet Black admitting her apparent new age in Captain America #22
Jet Black admitting her apparent new age in Captain America #22
Marvel Comics

As an avid comic book reader and a huge Captain America fan, Rick Remender's current run of Captain America volume 7 has been a nightmare, to say the least. There have been several problems with Remender's Cap that leave a bad taste in the mouth of fans. Remender has even told disgruntled fans over Twitter to go “drown themselves in hobo piss”. Yesterday Rick Remender tacked on his newest example of character abuse under the guise of creative license, turning fan-favorite Sam Wilson aka The Falcon into what can only be called a statutory rapist.

Current wirter of Captain America vol 7: Rick Remender
Current wirter of Captain America vol 7: Rick Remender
Getty Images and Wikipedia

One of the new characters introduced in Remender's Captain America is Jet Black, she's the daughter of well-known Captain America supervillain Zola. At the start of the series she's a very young child and is even referred to by Remender himself as being an infant. Over the span of Remender's Cap run only 12 years have past. All the previous information given to readers by Rick Remender places Jet Black at about 14 or 15 years old at most.

Here's where it gets sleazy: in issue #22, which came out on Wednesday featured an upsetting spread of panels depicting Sam Wilson getting drunk and sleeping with Jet Black who states that she's 23 years old - in contradiction to everything Remender has told us. Many defenders of Remender's action are complaining that since Jet Black herself claimed to be of age then there's nothing wrong; its painfully obvious that these people haven't read anything else beyond that single panel and certainly not the previous 21 issues that have been telling readers otherwise.

The photos included in this article's slideshow are pulled directly from the comics themselves if only to provide some hard evidence, each image cites which comic issue you can find the panels in. Its important to realize that Sam Wilson is in no way the problem here, in fact he's just as much a victim as Jet Black. The problem is Rick Remender.

Even if Jet Black is somehow really 23 years old through the magic of comic book space/time dynamics, nine years is still a pretty huge jump. It’s still hard to ignore the fact that she's still mentally immature and has suffered some pretty massive emotional trauma of late- not exactly a stellar example of unhindered ability to consent. Looking at the panels it’s clear that consent is hazy at best from both parties. The fact that consent is an argument at all here (from both sides of the controversy) should be an enormous red flag to both Marvel Comics and readers alike. Any situation where consent is this big of a gray area probably shouldn't be included in a Captain America comic.

Another upset for fan's is Rick Remender's decision to kill off long running character Sharon Carter; most fans believe that Remender “fridged” her. In comics the term “fridging” shortened from the full phrase “Women in Refrigerators” is used to describe a situation in which an autonomous female character is killed off for no other purpose than to further the plot of a male character. The name itself comes from Green Lantern #54, published in 1994, in which Green Lantern Kyle Rayner comes home to find his girlfriend strangled and stuffed inside his refrigerator. Since this incident, “fridging” has been used to refer to female characters killed, maimed or de-powered to further the plotline of a male counterpart Sharon Carter's death occurred almost immediately following the first big offense Remender committed in the name of uninspired writing: the death of Captain America's young adopted son Ian Rogers. It’s bad enough to kill a 12 year old kid on panel, but when you factor in that he was brutally killed by being shot through the throat- its pretty messed up by anyone's standards.

Angry comic fans have started the hashtag #FireRickRemender on Twitter, tweeting angry messages directly to @Marvel. Fans are being urged to contact Marvel at mheroes@marvel.com with these complaints and to mark their emails with “okay to print” for further publicity. With the recent staggering box-office success of Captain America: The Winter Soldier it's enraging to think of all the potential new fans being turned off to Cap by Remender's sorry excuse for a Captain America comic. Not to mention how far Captain America book sales have plummeted with Remender at the helm. Long story short, this guy has got to go.