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Were Benghazi talking points discussed with a member of the Muslim Brotherhood?

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The White House ‘smoking gun’ email that reveals who instructed Susan Rice to blame the Benghazi attack on a video also exposes a very unusual recipient on its distribution list. The emails were sent by Benjamin Rhodes, Deputy National Security Adviser , as part of a plan to develop talking points about the Benghazi attacks on 9/11/2012. The memo was sent to White House staffers including Jay Carney, Jennifer Palmieri and David Plouffe, among others. An odd name on the list was Mehdi K. Alhassani.

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Alhassani was the leader of the Muslim Student Association (MSA), a Muslim Brotherhood front group and attended the sister mosque of the Islamic Society of Boston Cultural Center (ISBCC)a mosque attended by the Boston Marathon bombers. How did Alhassani become a Special Assistant to the Office of the Chief of Staff, National Security Council Staff, and Executive Office of the President? It is also unknown why a few hours before the Benghazi attack, Alhassani met in the White House with Samir Mayekar, National Security Director, Office of Presidential Personnel.

Proof of Alhassani’s affiliations with Islamist groups, is found in a document published by the Islamic Institute of Boston (IIB) entitled, Participants at the Citizen Dialogue Group. In his bio, Alhassani is identified as a student of George Washington University (GWU) who was President of the Muslim Student Association (MSA) there from 2005 to 2006 and who served as an intern at both the White House and the U.S. State Department.

In addition to a work history that includes time at the State Department and White House, Alhassani has also worked at the Arab American Institute (AAI), which actively collaborates with the Arab American Action Network (AAAN) and CAIR. The AAAN was founded in Chicago by Rashid Khalidi, who was the Director of the PLO press agency at a time when the PLO was designated as a terrorist organization. Khalidi is also a good friend of President Barack Obama and unrepentant terrorist, Bill Ayers.

He is not the only Muslim advising President Obama.

Egyptian magazine, Rose El-Youssef, in a December 22, 2012 article, claims that six American Islamist activists who work with the Obama administration are Muslim Brotherhood operatives who enjoy strong influence over U.S. policy.

The six named people include: Arif Alikhan, assistant secretary of Homeland Security for policy development; Mohammed Elibiary, a member of the Homeland Security Advisory Council; Rashad Hussain, the U.S. special envoy to the Organization of the Islamic Conference; Salam al-Marayati, co-founder of the Muslim Public Affairs Council (MPAC); Imam Mohamed Magid, president of the Islamic Society of North America (ISNA); and Eboo Patel, a member of President Obama’s Advisory Council on Faith-Based Neighborhood Partnerships.

Alikhan is a founder of the World Islamic Organization, which the magazine identifies as a Brotherhood “subsidiary.” It suggests that Alikhan was responsible for the “file of Islamic states” in the White House and that he provides the direct link between the Obama administration and the Arab Spring revolutions of 2011.

Elibiary, who has endorsed the ideas of radical Muslim Brotherhood luminary Sayyid Qutb, may have leaked secret materials contained in Department of Homeland Security databases, according to the magazine. He, however, denies having any connection with the Brotherhood.

Elibiary also played a role in defining the Obama administration’s counterterrorism strategy, and the magazine asserts that Elibiary wrote the speech Obama gave when he told former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to leave power but offers no source or evidence for the claim.

According to Rose El-Youssef, Rashad Hussain maintained close ties with people and groups that it says comprise the Muslim Brotherhood network in America. This includes his participation in the June 2002 annual conference of the American Muslim Council, formerly headed by convicted terrorist financier Abdurahman Alamoudi. He also participated in the organizing committee of the Critical Islamic Reflection along with important figures of the American Muslim Brotherhood such as Jamal Barzinji,Hisham al-Talib and Yaqub Mirza.

Regarding al-Marayati, who has been among the most influential Muslim American leaders in recent years, the magazine draws connections between MPAC in the international Muslim Brotherhood infrastructure.

Magid heads ISNA, which was founded by Brotherhood members, was appointed by Obama in 2011 as an adviser to the Department of Homeland Security. The magazine says that has also given speeches and conferences on American Middle East policy at the State Department and offered advice to the FBI.

Rose El-Youssef says Patel maintains a close relationship with Hani Ramadan, the grandson of Brotherhood founder Hasan al-Banna, and is a member of the Muslim Students Association, which it identifies as “a large Brotherhood organization.”

The question remains, how much of the United States policies are influenced by the Muslim Brotherhood?

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