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Verbiage in music

Over the past many years, the language used within the "creative" writing process in the music industry has gone through a huge transition. Now trying to find a way to justify such things, I thought I would try to lend a little perspective.

Words, themselves, have absolutely no value or meaning in and of themselves. They are simply building blocks just like Legos. An individual Lego has no value. It is simply a square or rectangle.

So when you think of words think of words as toys. Toys for the mind to play with. How you play with a word will determine its meaning and value.

For example, why is a chair something you sit in? What came first? The word or someone sitting in a creation? Now most will say, "Oh this comes from the French word "Chaiere" which means throne. But then the question would be where did that word come from? At some point in history someone named a chair a chair. But was the chair named before the word was created or was the chair created before the word to name it? You see, it always comes back to the same thing. A word is nothing more than a grouping of letters given meaning, value and definition by the usage.

So if you take this into context, those who say there are bad words or that there are improper slangs and the like are simply implying that the usage of those words is in a manner that is improper not the word itself. But tell me, why is the "F" word a bad word? It simply means in literal terms sex. Why is intercourse okay? But you see, the usage makes it a bad word because it's aggressive. If someone says to another guy, "You are a dirty mother-intercourser" is that any better? You are implying that someone has sex with his mother either way. But would someone say to someone, "Intercourse you!"? If he did, let's be honest, whatever anger was in place would quickly dissipate and be replaced with laughter and frivolity.

Or let's take it in the most generic situation... If you are with someone in the midst of a passionate interchange of bodily fluids and in a moment of erotic ecstasy you scream out, "Intercourse me!!!" you are likely to find that the moment may be compromised; at least the fire and passion compromised.

And so as you listen to those bad rap songs which have no purpose or meaning, realize that the entities who create such garbage have no understanding of language. They only know that others might find such verbiage attractive. They can use such words for not only a verb but a noun, adverb and adjective.

Words are toys for the mind. They are only a gathering of letters. It is in the usage that they can become mean, violent or inciting. If you look at the context of a word, that is what gives the actual word its meaning. The F word isn't a bad word. If you're making love and use it to heighten the fire and passion, is that bad thing? But if you tell someone "F... you", well unless you're planning to make love with him/her, it would be inciting.

I, personally, object to such verbiage in any form of entertainment. I don't think comics need to use those words if they are intelligent and creative. I think it is a shortcut used by many when they lack the creative vision to truly inspire a crowd and incite laughter through their thoughts. It is the reason Bill Cosby is so revered. He has always been able to entertain his audiences without having to go into graphic verbal detail that utilizes language that would ever be deemed inappropriate.

I do wish someone in the music industry would step in and say enough is enough. But it won't happen. Since they can do it now, they will continue to do it now. But tell me the truth, is there a classic song in the history of music that would have been better had the composer decided to speak in very graphic terms? Okay so it wouldn't have hurt something as terrible as "Afternoon Delight" by the equally horrible Starland Vocal Band. But that's truly the exception. Oh, and by the way, am I the only one who has ever noticed that the Who's song "Who Are You" features a quite explicitly used "F" word? It's always been played on the radio without any deletion or editing. And in the 1977 when it came out, such words were never heard on the air anywhere. So you see, I guess you can subtly use language. But tell me, would it have been any worse if Pete Townsend had written "hell" instead of the "F" word?