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Utah State football 2014: Former players thrive during NFL preseason openers

San Diego Chargers running back Kerwynn Williams.
San Diego Chargers running back Kerwynn Williams.
Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images

Who said Utah State Aggies football can't compete with the rest of the major in-state schools? Whoever said that didn't watch much NFL preseason action this week--because the Aggies brought the pain and the noise, along with stat stuffers on several teams.

Starting with San Diego Chargers running back and former Aggie standout Kerwynn Williams, Utah State represented--and frankly, overshadowed--other schools in the Beehive State with gusto. Williams spent all of last year on the Chargers practice squad--after being acquired from Indianapolis. It was clear from this week's game against the Dallas Cowboys that Williams is wanting more than just a spot on the Chargers this year.

Based on Williams' numbers alone against the Cowboys, he might get such an opportunity. He had six carries for 10 yards--but one yard came on a touchdown plunge on a handoff from ex-Southern Utah star QB Brad Sorensen.

Williams wasn't the only Aggie to thrive, either. Linebacker Jake Doughty is playing for the Green Bay Packers and he recorded five tackles while recovering a fumble in a loss. Probably the most surprising night, however, belonged to former Aggie cornerback Nevin Lawson, who suited up for the Detroit Lions and had five total tackles --one came on special teams--in a win.

The Oakland Raiders, long known for picking up players nobody wants, got huge production from former linebacker Aggie Bojay Filimoeatu. He had the second most tackles of any Aggie this weekend, recording six total in a loss.

But, it was veteran cornerback Jarrett Bush--who is still with the Packers--who had the most tackles of any Aggie this weekend. He had eight tackles to go with one sack in Green Bay's loss.

This shift in the state's NFL-ready talent towards Logan is obviously is a boon to future Aggies, who have long been considered doormats to Utah and BYU in terms of recruiting. The sooner that people begin realizing that good pro-level talent is now being developed in Cache Valley, the better off everyone will be.