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USC surgeons operate California's first robotic surgery

On Wednesday (July 16, 2014), Doctors at University of Southern California’s Keck Medical Center used a robotic surgical system on a patient with advanced prostate cancer, becoming the very first robotic-assisted surgical procedure using the new daVinci Xi system on a prostate cancer patient in the state of California.

This is a de Vinci System with splayed arms.
This is a de Vinci System with splayed arms.
©[2014] Intuitive Surgical, Inc.

The new technology was the da Vinci Xi System, and it was created by Intuitive Surgical located in Sunnyvale, CA. It was approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on April 1. The robotic system was designed to be an extension of the surgeon's eyes and hands, providing them greater dexterity, precision and ability to remove cancerous tissue in all quadrants of the abdomen and chest. It is the safest and least invasive treatment option.

Dr. Inderbir Gill, founding executive director of the USC Institute of Urology and urology department chairman, removed an advanced prostate cancer patient's prostate using the Xi robot, and the patient was discharged from the hospital Thursday, and is now recovering at home.

“Because of our reputation as a center for excellence in robotic surgery, patients come to USC for treatment from all over the world,” Gill said, “In addition, we are at the forefront of training other physicians from around the globe on these machines and in the latest robotic surgery techniques because we are committed to pushing the envelope of what is best for patients everywhere.”

The Keck Medical Center of USC is ranked among the Top 25 hospitals in the United States for urology and cancer care, and was awarded an “A” grade from The Leapfrog Group in March, which signifies the outstanding safety practices and patient outcomes.

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