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US Military Court Martial convicts in Ft Hood Massacre

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November 5, 2009 started out as just a day on Ft Hood near Killeen, TX however turned to the largest massacre on a military installation when Jihadist and US Army Psychologist Maj. Nidal Hasan killed 13 soldiers and wounded 30 more as they were processing upon return from combat.
After hearing more than 90 witnesses a 13 jury of 13 officers deliberated for 2 days on charges of premeditated murder. Today, almost 4 years later, Maj Hasan was convicted on 13 counts of premeditated murder and 32 counts of premeditated murder. With both votes unanimous Nidal Hasan is now eligible for the death penalty when the punishment phase of his court martial begins Monday.
After the verdict was announced, Neal Sher and Reed Rubinstein, attorneys for many of the Fort Hood victims, released the following statement:
"Today's guilty verdict, rendered almost four years after the attack, is only a first, small step down the path of justice for the victims.
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In light of this verdict, we again call on DOD and DOJ to stop their cynical "workplace violence" charade - a charade carried on despite Hasan's confessions and the mountain of evidence demonstrating that the attack was the work of an Islamic jihadist, working on behalf of al-Qaeda, who killed Americans for his "brothers" in the Middle East - and to stop denying the Fort Hood victims the Purple Hearts and medical and other benefits to which they are rightfully due. We call on Congress and the Executive Branch to fairly compensate the Fort Hood terror victims, in all respects, as the 9/11 Pentagon attack victims were compensated. And, we call on the government, finally, to accept responsibility for the harm done by its political correctness, spin and cover-up and to provide the victims and the American people with the truth, decency and accountability that they deserve."
The terrorist Hasan's conviction and sentencing is only the beginning, not the end of this story. Justice for the victims of Fort Hood will be done only when the government admits its mistakes, keeps its promises to 'make the victims whole' and comes clean about Fort Hood. The victims, and the American people, are owed nothing less."

Hasan acted as his own attorney throughout this case, called no witnesses and admitted his guilt during his opening statement describing himself as a soldier who “switched sides”. As an American-born Muslim, Hasan served in the US Army for 21 years; first as an enlisted soldier prior to obtaining his Bachelor’s Degree in 1997 and his medical degree in 2003.

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