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UFOs over Norway: CIA admits: 'That was us'

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There might be something to this transparency thing after all, given the tweet sent on the CIA Twitter account this week disclosing that the agency, and not extraterrestrials or even meteorologists' wayward experimental balloons, was responsible for the wave of UFO sightings that soared from the Scandinavian skies over Norway during the 1950s.

That's correct: The CIA.

The Daily Mail reported July 4 on the recent Central Intelligence Agency Twitter activity involving an admission that what had been thought to be Unidentified Flying Objects over Norway in the 1950s had actually been CIA missions. The tweet read, "That was us," and directed the reader to an government paper about U2 spy plane flyovers.

"Remember reports of unusual activity in the skies in the '50s? That was us," the tweet reads.

The good people of Norway began seeing flashing objects in their skies in the 1950s, as did airline pilots. The U2 spy plane flew at a ceiling of 60,000 feet, far above any regular aircraft of the time, so when pilots added their stories of UFO sightings to that of the citizenry, a bit of credibility crept into the rash of unidentified objects flying the Norwegian skies.

Of course, after American pilot Gary Powers was shot down over Russia, causing a major international incident between the U.S.S.R. and the United States, the secrecy of the U2 was lost. The more discerning began to suspect that all those UFO sightings over Norway, a country not too far from the Russian and Baltic State borders (all territorially part of the U.S.S.R. at the time) may not have been UFOs at all (only in the technical sense of being unidentified; not in that they could not be explained -- they just were not or were denied as having a governmental point of origin).

Six decades later and CIA finally has admitted that their secret U2 spy plane missions were likely the cause of most of those UFO sightings, explained by the Air Force's Project Blue Book, the official look into UFO sightings by the U. S. military, as sunlight flashing off of U2 planes as the sun set in the Norwegian sky. According to Afterposten (per BBC News), even with the conclusions drawn by the U. S. Air Force, the CIA refused to acknowledge the coincidental timings of U2 spy plane missions, the activity kept classified to keep it from being compromised by the Soviets in the Cold War Era.

Sometimes you have to hand it to those conspiracy theorists guys who have been harping on that tired old military intelligence/secret mission line all these years. Turns out they their paranoid speculations and extrapolations weren't so lunatic fringish after all.

And that transparency thing? It's nice to know that the CIA, for all its secretive maneuverings, isn't above providing a little transparency on their operations and taking responsibility for their activities -- albeit some six decades after the fact...

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