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U2 Delays Album and Tour, Steely Dan Sued

HOLLYWOOD, CA - MARCH 02: (L-R) Musicians The Edge, Bono, Larry Mullen Jr., and Adam Clayton of U2 perform onstage during the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre on March 2, 2014 in Hollywood, California.
HOLLYWOOD, CA - MARCH 02: (L-R) Musicians The Edge, Bono, Larry Mullen Jr., and Adam Clayton of U2 perform onstage during the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre on March 2, 2014 in Hollywood, California.Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images

With a free song on iTunes to benefit the RED organization, and an Oscar nominated song, it may have seem that a new album from U2 was about to be in order for 2014. Not quite.

According to Billboard, The band recently scrapped plans to release a new album this year, thus giving themselves more time to work with songwriters and producers Ryan Tedder and Paul Epworth. This comes after frontman Bono told USA today, that he and the bandmates were hoping to release a new album this summer, and go on tour the following fall. But in order to have more time, both the album and tour have been pushed back to 2015. Tour dates are expected to begin next summer, but so far there is no timeline on when in 2015 will be album come out.

In other music news, Steely Dan frontmen Donald Fagen and Walter Becker are being sued by former vocalist David Palmer, seeking royalties from his work on the band’s 1972 debut album Can’t Buy a Thrill.

Palmer sang on tracks “Dirty Work” and “Brooklyn (Owes The Charmer Under Me)”, and was also the lead singer when Steely Dan was on tour supporting the debut album. Palmer filed the legal papers in Los Angeles, after being asked by the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA) on confirmation on entitlement to royalties for his work. Palmer has confirmed that he was paid for the period for tracks that he had led, but not for digital royalties.

The pending lawsuit has also been thought of being the result of the song “Dirty Work” to not be included in soundtrack to the hit film American Hustle, in which the song could of have been profiled heavily.