Skip to main content

See also:

Twitter suspends accounts? Sharing Jennifer Lawrence naked photos brings trouble

Jennifer Lawrence's privacy violated with stolen nude photos
Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

The Jennifer Lawrence naked photos are going around the social media food chain faster than a wild fire. The actress was allegedly hacked and her privacy violated as millions of people have seen several pictures of the Hollywood star naked in photographs. According to Gawker on Sunday, the web exploded with pictures of the 100 plus stars who were hacked and the images uploaded. That's right the images were illegally obtained and spread online without the permission of the celebrities.

So what happens now? It might be Sunday, but Hollywood never sleeps and anyone who shared the pictures had better be ready for some serious repercussions. The social media giant Twitter is apparently looking to stop the naked photo sharing and suspending accounts that have shared any pictures of the naked stars.

Before anyone goes whining about freedom of speech, there is the right to privacy to consider. The stars who have images stolen from them deserve the return of their digital items. This means their privacy trumps any freedom of expression. And it also might lead to more than suspension for Twitter users who shared the pictures. There could be monetary damages expected from anyone who participated in touching the stolen property.

Jennifer Lawrence reps have promised to come full throttle at anyone sharing the pictures. This would probably include the hacker who stole the images and anyone who shuffled them around online thinking it was a cool idea to embarrass the actress further. It is great to see that Twitter is going to put a stop to the sharing of these private images too. Let’s hope the cops track down these criminals with the digital footprint they left and someone ends up in jail.

Stealing private pictures isn't cool just because the person is a star doesn't mean anyone has a right to violate their privacy.