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Tweens: in front or behind the camera?

Tweens: in front or behind the camera?
Tweens: in front or behind the camera?
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Tweens: on or behind the camera?

For those kids who want to perform in front of the camera, an excellent source is www.childreninfilm.com. They have all the ins and outs of the industry for kids, advice for parents, and many resources to guide you. In a blog by parents of a young performer who was cast as the young Clark Kent in Superman (www.childreninfilm.blogspot.com), they talk about the ups and downs of being a child actor, and how parents must work “hard every day to ensure their success not only as actors, but also as well-adjusted members of society.”

To get first-hand information about people who worked in the business as kids, go to www.kenneymyers.com/blog/10-famous-kids-named-ken/. A Hollywood talent manager offers tips to child actors in an article called Would You Let Your Child into Show Business? (www.laparent.com).

Of course, all tweens do not want to be performers. They might like working behind the camera. There are many opportunities to work on films or TV. Some of these jobs are production, costumes, makeup, writers, directors, lighting, sound, camera operators, studio teachers, and caterers. Behind the scenes careers are listed in www.filmtvcareers.about.com. www.entertainmentcareers.net also describes jobs.

1. Make Up Artist bring characters to life.

2. Casting Directors is responsible for which actors play which roles.

3. Production Assistant is the “grunt;” they do lots of things.

4. Screenwriter writes for film.

5. Prop Master is in charge of any object that can is part of the physical structure of the set.

6. Production Designer is responsible for visual look of set.

7. Location Manager finds the shooting locations and closes the deal.

So You Want to Work in Movies? Is an article in www.cineman.co.uk. The writer summarizes the questions someone might have about the industry, and he gives suggestions to tackle the field. If tweens are interested in working behind the camera, there are outlets for encouraging their creativity.

Los Angeles, as one of the major film capitols of the world, is brimming with opportunity. www.ehow.com talks about film camps for kids in the Los Angeles area. These are offered after school or during vacations. They even have information about a film camp that originated from the Chicago Film Festival. The New York Film Academy, which has a Los Angeles branch, has film camps for tweens (www.nyfa.edu). There is also a group called iD Film Academy for ages 13-18, with locations around the country (www.idtech.com). There are many opportunities available, and your tween is in the right place to pursue them. Explore your options, do some research, and help your tween find the right outlet for his or her talents!