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Tupac Shakur's last words finally revealed as expletive directed at officer

Tupac Shakur's last words have finally been revealed, and anyone who expected a profound revelation or the identity of his killer will be disappointed. The rapper, who was shot on Sept. 7, 1996 and died at the University Medical Center of Southern Nevada days later, reportedly uttered the phrase "F--- you" as his last. He was just 25 years old at the time of his death.

Rapper Nas performs during a tribute to Tupac at the VH1 Hip Hop Honors October 3, 2004 in New York City
Rapper Nas performs during a tribute to Tupac at the VH1 Hip Hop Honors October 3, 2004 in New York CityPhoto by Scott Gries/Getty Images

Vegasseven.com was the first media outlet to get the scoop on Tupac Shakur's last words with their exclusive interview with Sergeant Chris Carroll, who was the first police officer to arrive at the scene on the night when Tupac Shakur was shot.

Carroll was a member of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department at the time of Tupac Shakur's murder.Sergeant Carroll was riding a bicycle when he got the call that shots had been fired near the intersection of Flamingo and Koval.

When Carroll reached Tupac Shakur on that fateful evening, the rapper was bleeding but conscious. The sergeant asked Shakur who had shot him. It was a question that would remain unanswered.

This new information regarding Tupac Shakur's last words could potentially put to rest theories that the rapper is actually still alive, having faked his own death. The website TMZ helped contribute to the theory that Shakur is still alive with their report and photos suggesting that the rapper was seen in a bar on Bourbon Street in 2009.

Caroll recalled the events of the night of Tupac Shakur's murder, detailing exactly what transpired once he reached the wounded rapper:

"I'm looking at Tupac, and he's trying to yell back at Suge, and I'm asking him, 'Who shot you? What happened? Who did it?'

And he was just kind of ignoring me ... I kept asking over and over, 'Who did this? Who shot you?' And he basically kept ignoring me.

And then I saw in his face, in his movements, all of a sudden in the snap of a finger, he changed. And he went from struggling to speak, being non-cooperative, to an 'I'm at peace' type of thing. Just like that.

He went from fighting to 'I can't do it.' And when he made that transition, he looked at me, and he's looking right in my eyes.

And that's when I looked at him and said one more time, 'Who shot you?'

He looked at me and he took a breath to get the words out, and he opened his mouth, and I thought I was actually going to get some co-operation. And then the words came out: 'F--- you.'"