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Truth Commission: Icelandic Lake Monster Does Exist

Lost in all the excitement of a possible volcanic eruption capable of stopping air flights as it did in 2010 or maybe the fault of the Justin Timberlake concert in Iceland was the finding of a commission to ascertain the existence of a lake monster. Warning:the following will have unpronounceable (by most Americans) places and people in Iceland.

The eruption at Holuhraun this morning (9/3/14).
Páll Stefánsson

Lagarfljótsormurinn, the giant serpent rumored to inhabit the lake Lagarfljót near Egilsstaðir in East Iceland truly exists, as announced on Saturday by the majority of a 13-person truth commission established in 2012 by the Fljótsdalshérað municipal council. They determined that a video of the alleged monster shot by Hjörtur E. Kjerúlf was authentic and was entitled to a prize of ISK 500,000 (USD 4,300, EUR 3,300). In addition, Hjörtur received an ISK 50,000 prize from local tourism cooperative Þjónustusamfélagið Fljótsdalshéraði for having marketed the region as a tourist destination with his video. Personally, this may be great for monster hunters but many may prefer shots of the hot springs.

There is a nice story regarding this Wyrm of Lagarfljót. Legend says there once was a young girl living beside the lake acquired a gold broach. She placed the broach in a box, underneath a tiny worm, to increase her gold. Soon the worm had outgrown the box. Panicking, the girl grabbed the box and threw it far into the lake. Time passed, and the worm became a monstrous wyrm so powerful that even the greatest magicians declared that they were unable to overpower it. But, they managed to fasten its head and tail to the lake bottom. There the wyrm will most likely stay bound till the end of all days, causing no harm. The worm-like creature has been seen coiled near the shore by countless eyewitnesses, the oldest written account being the year 1345.

In the latest eruption news:
The Holuhraun eruption continues. An earthquake of magnitude 5.5 hit the northern rim of the Bárðabunga caldera this morning, Sept 3 shortly after 3 am Iceland time. This was one of the largerst since the activity started on August 19. Due to another possible volcanic eruption, a large area north of Vatnajökull glacier has been closed.