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Town officials meet in Washington, DC to defend local democracy

This September, local government officials from nearly 13,000 towns and townships from across America will meet in Washington, D.C. to preserve local democracy.

The event, sponsored by the National Association of Towns and Townships (NATaT), will feature interactive discussions with senior Obama Administration and Congressional leaders on ways to enhance federal resources in towns, townships, and other rural and small urban areas.

Dubbed “America’s Town Meeting”, the conference will cover jobs in America’s small communities, transportation infrastructure, benefits for volunteer firefighters and emergency medical responders, and homeland security/public safety.

NATaT was formed 30 years ago to represent smaller communities, towns and townships, and other suburban and rural localities in Washington. Its mission is to represent grassroots local government at the national level and educate lawmakers and other federal officials about the unique nature of small town government operations as well as the need for policies that meet special needs of suburban and non-metro communities.

Wisconsin will be the hosting state this year with the opportunity to showcase products and special features from around the state to other NATaT members.

“We plan to have some of Wisconsin’s best known food products such as cheese, sausage, fruits, and more as complimentary items for conferees,” says Executive Director Richard Stadelman for the Wisconsin Towns Association.

“We are still looking for products or other unique items that can be awarded as door prizes.”

Stadelman urges town or village officers who have connections to a Wisconsin business or product that can be promoted at the NATaT conference to contact the WTA office in Shawano, WI.

Wisconsin was the featured state in 2001 with over 150 representatives. Stadelman hopes to see one or more representative from each county attend this year.
 

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