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Tips for a Proper Thank You after an Interview

Although many people feel that doing well during an interview is the main focus, your follow-up strategy is also important. Whether you send a thank you note, follow-up phone call or email, you definitely want to keep in contact with the hiring manager. Here are some tips to help you send the proper thank you after an interview.

It may be old-fashioned but a thank you letter is still a great way to follow-up with a hiring manager. You may decide to email the letter especially if you are seeking a position in IT. However, you definitely want to send a note of gratitude to the hiring manager for considering you for the position.

Be sincere in your letter. No one wants to hear about all of your computer skills and variety of degrees. However, hiring managers want to know how your skills can help them. For example, you can mention how you supervised both fulltime staff and interns to excel on a team project. Although you may have mentioned a similar example during the interview, it is okay to include in your thank you note and remind the hiring manager why you are a right fit for the job.

If the hiring manager tells you to follow-up with a call, wait a few days. Don’t call the next day. You don’t want to appear anxious and desperate for the position, even if you feel this is your ideal job. During the phone call, remind the hiring manager that you are following up about the position and want to know if any additional information is needed. On the phone, you want to remain professional. Remember, you don’t have the job yet so don’t become to relax just because the hiring manager told you to call.

When you send an email note to a hiring manager, the subject should have your name and position displayed. You want to remind the hiring manager about your interview and the position. Since it is email, don’t write any slang words or smiley faces in your email. Although it may be nice to send those messages for family and friends, it is definitely not appropriate in the professional world.